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91
Sure, sure, but it's a hopeless case of overanalysis, particularly because you have apparently forgotten the topic by now. Are you saying that there's Dutch influence in the 2nd Amendment or in the way Americans conceive of gun rights? Are you desperately hoping some such influence would be found?
No, like I said the meaning of 18th century English coupled with (American-)English common law is required to properly interpret that one.
92
@Mike, still no luck, but it might be somehow XP specific too, I'll try to test it there too (testing that build under Windows 10 doesn't show any issues with values).
93
Otter Browser Forum / Re: Confused about HTML5
Last post by Emdek -
@Borut, @Otto Lutrinae, there are three options:
  • try version that comes in ZIP archive (as of now it is only missing H264, but it will be available later thanks to OpenH264 library), the one marked as ZIP package for Windows XP or later, 32 bit;
  • try experimental QtWebEngine build (this one is also missing H264, but probably permanently...);
  • install this to allow WMF to handle WebM: https://www.webmproject.org/ie/
Windows Media Foundation works in different way and so far I haven't seen any library that could take advantage of both legacy codecs and new system.
The main advantage of WMF is that it has built-in support for multiple formats, but sadly only proprietary stuff (plus it seems that full support is available only in Windows 10):
https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/dd757927(v=vs.85).aspx

As noted earlier, GStreamer seems to be better choice but at the cost of extra package size (plus new infrastructure to build such packages with MSVC)...
94
Otter Browser Forum / Re: (Pre) RC 1 release (01.10.2017)
Last post by Emdek -
@kwaku1, spoko, wersja dla XP powinna się trzymać jeszcze długo, a co do tamtej funkcji, to najlepiej śledź jej ticket:
https://github.com/OtterBrowser/otter-browser/issues/437
95
My basic argument is that, unlike the Puritanical English colonies, certain liberties that Americans call central to their core first existed in New York -- and tend to date back to New Amsterdam.
Sure, sure, but it's a hopeless case of overanalysis, particularly because you have apparently forgotten the topic by now. Are you saying that there's Dutch influence in the 2nd Amendment or in the way Americans conceive of gun rights? Are you desperately hoping some such influence would be found?

To quote my favourite source since yesterday,
Quote from: Natural Rights, Common Law, and the English Right of Self-Defense By Saul Cornell
Only four of the original state constitutions singled out the right to bear arms for explicit protection: Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Vermont, and Massachusetts.
I'd say four is just about enough to raise the suspicion that there was something abrewing between Americans and guns already back then. Either way, no New York or Amsterdam among them.

Never been there. The place holds no particular appeal to me.
Oh. Okay.
96
But of course I must respect your national pride as you try to smuggle Dutch influences into the foundering principles of USA.
It could be a completely independent development, but it seems unlikely. My basic argument is that, unlike the Puritanical English colonies, certain liberties that Americans call central to their core first existed in New York -- and tend to date back to New Amsterdam. But you don't have to take it from me. To quote a third party that I believe @OakdaleFTL likes:

Many American geographical names (Harlem, Flushing, Brooklyn), landmarks (Wall Street), families (Roosevelt, Van Buren) and words (dollar, cookie, boss, coleslaw) originate from the 17th-century Dutch colony New Netherland on Manhattan. Some five million Americans are of Dutch descent. The Dutch conceptions of religious tolerance and multiculturalism had a tremendous impact on the construction of the independent American Republic. The American Declaration of Independence (1776) is so similar to the Dutch Act of Abjuration (1581) that John Adams went as far as to say that "the origins of the two Republics are so much alike that the history of one seems but a transcript from that of the other." According to American author Russell Shorto, it is not the early English settlements or the Pilgrim's colony that represents a model of what America was to become, but rather the Dutch settlement on the island of Manhattan, "the first tolerant, multiethnic, upwardly mobile society on America's shores."

It shows most of the places I saw when I visited it. Hopefully nicely familiar to you too  :)
Never been there. The place holds no particular appeal to me. :)
97
The Lounge / Re: True or false?
Last post by Luxor -
False. Mint 18 for me.

You have kept an old video recording for sentimental reasons.
98
The Lounge / Re: What Time Is It?
Last post by Luxor -
13:01
99
The Lounge / Re: For keeps or drop.
Last post by Luxor -
Guitar tuner.
100
The Lounge / Re: What have you just eaten or drunk?
Last post by Luxor -
 :coffee: