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Topic: Food (Read 8607 times)

  • Frenzie
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Food
Do you like to cook? I do. I also like to watch some cooking shows occasionally. Gennaro is one of my favorites.

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Re: Food
Reply #25
Who's read some ersi here, the guy must be that very guru who troubled MyOpera not so long ago! :P:D
And Bel, what if his metabolism is a sort of that of a plant? You said "organic life"? Plants are organic too, and seeing my windowsill cacti for quite awhile, I can assure you - if they eat at all, their stuff must be mostly minerals from the turf and occasional "nawóz do kaktusów i sukulentów". What they like most is light - which they must use to produce carbo-molecules to fill themselves with more green flesh!:D

Re: Food
Reply #26
....the Americans that have always surprised me, very open mind and curious about everything, I like them.  Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...


Most Americans don't travel because they can't be bothered, they're quite content at home. " I'll watch the video......"

Then there are those that can't afford to travel, because with the present occupant in the White House, one never knows where the future economy will go, or where it's gone has left them high & dry.

Traveling overseas is considered overrated to many, & is considered a luxury to some.....way down on the list of importance compared to what Americans see as enjoyable. 

Those that do trek out are usually quite comfortable economically, & are always into having something to talk about when they get home.....especially the ladies....love to brag how much money they spent much to the chagrin of their friends.

Personally, I travel for most of the year (retired), & 90% of that travel is overseas.......my favorite spots are the Islands in the South Pacific.

As far as food......as long as it doesn't stare back at me when I'm eatin' it, or as long as it isn't what over 75% of the world would consider as great fishin' bait, I'd give it a go!

Re: Food
Reply #27
I watched it for a bit, but it got somewhat old.

In about thirty seconds.

Re: Food
Reply #28
It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.

A couple of your favorite Portuguese dishes. I like to try new things.

Re: Food
Reply #29
I had something like the below a couple of days...oats done in the oven with strawberries, raspberries and bananas. It was very nice. My daughter made it for a Christmas morning breakfast. I'm going to try it with raisins, cranberries and pine nuts.
http://www.skinnytaste.com/2012/01/baked-oatmeal-with-blueberries-and.html

Re: Food
Reply #30
As far as food......as long as it doesn't stare back at me when I'm eatin' it, or as long as it isn't what over 75% of the world would consider as great fishin' bait, I'd give it a go!

Me, too.
:)


  • Frenzie
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Re: Food
Reply #32
Today's lunch hardly qualifies as cooking either, but I think it was a successful experiment.

Ingredients:

  • 1 or 2 eggs (I used one fairly large egg)
  • 1 avocado
  • a bunch of sprouts (I used alfalfa, leek, and radish)
  • 2 medium-sized tortillas

I fried the egg over medium, and right after flipping it over I put the two tortillas on top to heat them up. Meanwhile I sliced open the avocado, after which flipped the tortillas around to heat them from the other side. I subsequently put a plate, knife, and spoon into position, and took the sprouts out of the fridge. By that time the egg was done, so I transfered the tortillas and egg to the plate, sliced the egg in two to put half in the top middle of each tortillas, and divided the avocado on top. To finish I "garnished" it with copious amounts of sprouts.

Re: Food
Reply #33
Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...
Hint: there's no such thing, Large and diverse country and all that. Attitudes differ greatly, often depending the region or sub-region of the country. America also has an image problem of a lot of people with open mouths and closed minds, often in the South East that give the rest of us a bad name.

  • string
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Re: Food
Reply #34

Today's lunch hardly qualifies as cooking either, but I think it was a successful experiment.

Ingredients:

  • 1 or 2 eggs (I used one fairly large egg)
  • 1 avocado
  • a bunch of sprouts (I used alfalfa, leek, and radish)
  • 2 medium-sized tortillas

I fried the egg over medium, and right after flipping it over I put the two tortillas on top to heat them up. Meanwhile I sliced open the avocado, after which flipped the tortillas around to heat them from the other side. I subsequently put a plate, knife, and spoon into position, and took the sprouts out of the fridge. By that time the egg was done, so I transfered the tortillas and egg to the plate, sliced the egg in two to put half in the top middle of each tortillas, and divided the avocado on top. To finish I "garnished" it with copious amounts of sprouts.

I found that a bit unnerving.

I hope you're feeling much better now.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Food
Reply #35
I found that a bit unnerving.

That coming from the man who eats fried kipper for breakfast. :lol:  ;D

  • Belfrager
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Re: Food
Reply #36

Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...
Hint: there's no such thing, Large and diverse country and all that. Attitudes differ greatly, often depending the region or sub-region of the country. America also has an image problem of a lot of people with open mouths and closed minds, often in the South East that give the rest of us a bad name.

I know that (well, except the South East part...).

I meant what I said. For the minority that by cultural, artistic, historic, gastronomic, you-name-it reasons of Americans are interested in visiting Europe, just a small minority amongst that minority wants expressly to visit Portugal. Those are not ordinary, mass tourism people. American crème de la crème. :)

Increasing every year, by the way. It must be for my posts... :)
A matter of attitude.

Re: Food
Reply #37
Depending on the ingredients, bouillon cubes can be alright. If you want to be sure it's decent, you can make your own stock.

Bouillon cubes :o >:(

I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice.  ;D

Re: Food
Reply #38
Decades ago I worked in Korea for a couple of years and learned to eat things I'd never dreamed of before.

Most of my compatriots never ventured outside the small compound we lived in, but I made local friends and ate out frequently. One of the things that I came to like was a pickled and fermented cabbage dish called kimchi...hot, hot, hot. I still buy some from time to time. In Korea, kimchi is god, even in N. Korea.

Take a look at the Kimchi festival where Korean women are making 25 tons of the delicacy.
http://www.weather.com/travel/korean-women-make-25-tons-kimchi-poor-photos-20131118

  • Frenzie
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Re: Food
Reply #39
So it's like a spicy zuurkool (sour cole/cabbage, i.e. Sauerkraut)? Just last night I spiced up my zuurkool with some jalapeño peppers.

  • ersi
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Re: Food
Reply #40

So it's like a spicy zuurkool (sour cole/cabbage, i.e. Sauerkraut)? Just last night I spiced up my zuurkool with some jalapeño peppers.

Doesn't look like Sauerkraut to me, even though I'm sure it must stink strong http://s.imwx.com/dru/2013/11/c1a9221f-253e-4110-b149-8948ac928416_650x366.jpg

  • Frenzie
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Re: Food
Reply #41
Well sure, they use Chinese cabbage (apparently called Napa cabbage in English) instead of some variety of white cabbage, and they don't cut it up. Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.

Edit: English Wikipedia sources a similar statement from http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/vegetables/a/sauerkraut.htm

Re: Food
Reply #42

Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.


Indeed, now that you mention it, I remember how I enjoined "varza murata" in Romania and "savanyú káposzta" in Hungary.

  • ersi
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Re: Food
Reply #43


Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.


Indeed, now that you mention it, I remember how I enjoined "varza murata" in Romania and "savanyú káposzta" in Hungary.

Here's the Russian variety. In Siberia they touch Mongolia. Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.

Re: Food
Reply #44

Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.

As far as I can tell, the big difference lies in the way the suerkraut was fermented, industrially or naturally matured in wood barrels.
You hardly can find the naturally matured one at the supermarket ;)

  • ersi
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Re: Food
Reply #45


Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.

As far as I can tell, the big difference lies in the way the suerkraut was fermented, industrially or naturally matured in wood barrels.
You hardly can find the naturally matured one at the supermarket ;)
Right, I mean the wood barrel one. This is totally Estonian (or German if you wish).

The Russian one in the picture I linked is called "Siberian or Far East variety" on Russian Wikipedia, "which contains carrot in distinction from the variety used in European Russia." (Not so) oddly, we have carrot added to near-raw cabbage in our supermarkets too. I still refuse to call it sauerkraut, even though they do.

Re: Food
Reply #46
Right, I mean the wood barrel one. This is totally Estonian (or German if you wish).

I wouldn't call it neither Estonian nor German. It's simply the original and best tasting. Anything else is a cheap knock off.
You'll get served that  cheap knock off even in German restaurants.
I can't tell about restaurants for billionaires though.

Re: Food
Reply #47
I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I save all my carrot tops, skins, celery bits & leaves, tomato bits, & most all veggi parts & bits (except onion skins & potato skins), any bones, chicken skins, & fat trimmings. The more chicken & meat bones you have the better.

I put them in a freezer bag.

When there's a full bag or full bags, I put a quart of water into my 10 qt. Pressure Cooker, then all the bits I can jam in there ....... salt & pepper & any spice that makes sense ........ cook it on medium for about an hour or so ..... let it cool......

Then I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Food
Reply #48
I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays

We do the same thing. :)

Re: Food
Reply #49

I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I save all my carrot tops, skins, celery bits & leaves, tomato bits, & most all veggi parts & bits (except onion skins & potato skins), any bones, chicken skins, & fat trimmings. The more chicken & meat bones you have the better.

I put them in a freezer bag.

When there's a full bag or full bags, I put a quart of water into my 10 qt. Pressure Cooker, then all the bits I can jam in there ....... salt & pepper & any spice that makes sense ........ cook it on medium for about an hour or so ..... let it cool......

Then I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.


I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.


That's basically what I do, but don't use ice cube trays. When the stock pot has cooled, I strain it and fill the bags, which go into the freezer for later use.

The chicken bits, which are of no use to me, also go into bags for later consumption by our dog, Sebastian. My wife eats the bones.