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Poll

Which

  • 21st century architecture is better than earlier architecture
    2 (66.7%)
  • 21st century architecture is worse than earlier architecture
    1 (33.3%)
  • beer is better than either
    0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 3

Topic: 21st century architecture (Read 19720 times)

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
21st century architecture
Buildings say a lot about the builders and the people who elect to use them. What buildings of this century would you like to highlight and why? Which are the best? Which are the worst? Which are interesting, which are boring? Which ones probably wouldn't be made before or after? How will they affect the neighbourhood, how would they age?

What can we say about current architecture? What should we be quiet about? What are the hopes and fears?

  • rjhowie
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #175
The language is expertly universal mind you......
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • ensbb3
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #176
paradoxal
Paradoxical* [ Borrows heavily from Latin, ;) ]
More room and for free.
There's no doubt many a word has multiple meanings... But in this case you shortened a phrase - "free of charge" - which is just a bad writing habit everyone suffers from from time to time occasionally. Redundancies in words and meanings can be avoided by swapping terms around.

However, technically the statement is still false. The 'currency' in jail is time. And time is money. Depending on how you look at it.
(I guess if your time is worthless then it's a wash.)
What I meant it's that is better to be in jail than to be at such "capsule hotel".
It'd be novel to stay in one once or twice. Given my height it would probably get old fast.

  • Belfrager
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #177
Hello ensbb3
The 'currency' in jail is time... yes indeed. And time is much more valuable than simple worthless money. Time is all you have.

Those capsule hotels are meant to reduce human dignity, to treat humans as insects, insignificant beings in a cage. Asian societies always had a propensity for doing that.
A matter of attitude.

  • ensbb3
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #178
Olá
Those capsule hotels are meant to reduce human dignity, to treat humans as insects, insignificant beings in a cage. Asian societies always had a propensity for doing that.
Indeed. Although I'd assume it serves a practical purpose more than meant to be degrading. Given the population densities.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #179
Capsule hotels are transitory, a means to rejuvenate and refresh on the way to home or work. Small, windowless rooms or capsules are the best way to get a great night's sleep (good ventilation and sound insulation are of course a given). 

There is a similar trend here in Stockholm where store basements are turned into hotels. The airport also had a capsule hotel a long while ago, but that one is gone decades ago. There's a reconstructed 747, but that is more in the youth hostel category.

While originally intended as an alternative to going home, longer-term stays are attractive too. Hotel rooms are a distraction from the place you visit. Unless that place is miserable of course, then lounging at the hotel can be a refuge. Compact hotels tend to be in more optimal locations than traditional hotels. That's all a function of real estate prices. Since a compact hotel uses less real estate, that is less a cost factor, and they can be at more expensive locations.

Which is pretty much the case in Asia as well. Room size is not a function of population size, but of real estate prices. China has a higher population than Japan, but while Japanese rooms tend to be small and clever,  Chinese hotel rooms were traditionally large and miserable. This is changing now, the Chinese are learning from the Japanese and the Europeans, rooms are getting smaller and much better, but large, miserable hotel rooms are supposedly common in Asia (though I have never opted for any). 

  • ensbb3
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #180
Capsule hotels are transitory, a means to rejuvenate and refresh on the way to home or work.
An interesting concept. I'd still want to, blindly, argue the concept is derivative of the environment. Way more space in a capusle than the train ride home right after work, so why not chill and catch a later ride home?
Small, windowless rooms or capsules are the best way to get a great night's sleep (good ventilation and sound insulation are of course a given).
And I get it. If I could push the autopilot for a self driving car on my way home and crawl off in the back seat I'd be in haven. But then that kinda seems the death of capsule rooms in that sense.
The airport also had a capsule hotel a long while ago, but that one is gone decades ago.
This makes sense, to me anyway. Long layover - wanna get out of the airport atmosphere. Yeah, I'd appreciate it. Seems maybe it didn't work so well... at least years ago.
There's a reconstructed 747, but that is more in the youth hostel category.
I can even understand this... Just couldn't find an emoji that expressed the look on my face. (≈$226 for the "Double Deluxe Ensuite (Cockpit Suite)". Yeah, I spent too much time on that site.)
While originally intended as an alternative to going home, longer-term stays are attractive too.
But this just isn't for me. I prefer the refuge option at least.
Which is pretty much the case in Asia as well. Room size is not a function of population size, but of real estate prices. China has a higher population than Japan, but while Japanese rooms tend to be small and clever,  Chinese hotel rooms were traditionally large and miserable. This is changing now, the Chinese are learning from the Japanese and the Europeans, rooms are getting smaller and much better, but large, miserable hotel rooms are supposedly common in Asia (though I have never opted for any).
But moreover all these places have way more people than I'm used to. Also dependency on public transit and otherwise dealing with limited mobility (and people) is(/are) a part of culture.

It really doesn't cost that much to put a decent car on the road legally, especially given what it can return in regards to mobility options. Being able to drive up the road to get a place away from the crowd is a luxury in and of itself. To me.  
  • Last Edit: 2017-04-03, 14:08:29 by ensbb3

  • Belfrager
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #181
Small, windowless rooms or capsules are the best way to get a great night's sleep (good ventilation and sound insulation are of course a given).
Coffins...
Bunch of vampires.
A matter of attitude.

  • krake
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #182
Coffins...
Bunch of vampires.
Not exactly. Coffins for the poor and nice bedrooms for the vampires.

Wonder when our honored politicians will spend their nights abroad in small, windowless capsules? ;)


  • Belfrager
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #183
Coffins for the poor and nice bedrooms for the vampires.
With a little help from myself finally this thread entered the right way. Architecture turned at the XXI century just like the clock industry, cheap digital for the poor, extremely expensive "analogic" luxury only for the rich.

There's not any reason to justify to close people inside "capsules", even less by trying to justify it with commuting/economic reasons.
When industrial factories were invented, proletarians were not put inside sarcophagus.

A matter of attitude.

  • OakdaleFTL
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Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #184
Consider the likelihood of a nuclear holocaust! We can all be ashes together! :)
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