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1
DnD Central / Re: Climate Change and You
Last post by Frenzie -
I see. So it is like a rotating trophy title - everybody will get to be the greenest in turn.
I think there's a truth behind it, as the article I linked puts it:
Quote
"Tallinn [...] demonstrated commitment and concrete actions to create healthier, better places for its citizens," said Commissioner for Environment, Oceans and Fisheries, Virginijus Sinkevičius.
I don't know who's to blame for the "Europe's greenest city" phrasing[1] when it means something closer to the city in Europe that has arguably made the biggest improvements over the last few years. When you more accurately say something like "Europe's most greenifying city" it's obvious that it could still easily be one of the very worst.[2]
Largely rhetorical since I blame the article's headline writer. The EU calls it a "European Green Capital" award which doesn't imply it's the greenest city, just that it's a city that's done something they apparently want to spotlight (or that has managed to successfully lobby for the title in spite of its meager actual achievements).
I hope it's not quite that dire of course. :)
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DnD Central / Re: Climate Change and You
Last post by ersi -
I see. So it is like a rotating trophy title - everybody will get to be the greenest in turn. Maybe even like the "culture capital" title: Several capitals at the same time :D

I rewatched the video in my previous post more carefully to see how many bicyclists I spot. There's one at Kosmos stop at 4:47. He is supposed to ride on the marked edge of the car lane, but instead he is riding on the pedestrian sidewalk, against the rules as usual. Bicyclists only drive on their designated edge of the car lane when they feel suicidal. (I'm fairly suicidal. I occasionally ride on the tram tracks.)

And that's it. That's the only bicyclist I noticed in the whole video going through the busiest parts of Tallinn. There was just one and he was not brave enough to ride on the stripe designated for bicycles. Quite a well-earned "greenest" title.

There's the Paberi stop at 6:07. It's been revamped entirely for pedestrians plus the tram tracks. It is a very remarkable improvement from the pedestrian point of view compared to what used to be there last century. However, guess what they did to achieve this. They cut a whole new highway through the city, erasing some dilapidated blocks parallel to this pedestrian section. The logic is obvious: For every widening of pedestrian space, cars must receive at least as much.
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DnD Central / Re: Climate Change and You
Last post by Frenzie -
Those EU nominations seem random. Judge for yourself how green the city is.
I think these things are meant more as encouragement toward good development because otherwise a Dutch city such as Enschede, Zwolle, Leiden or Alkmaar would win every year for still being better at everything, which would be boring at best and discouraging at worst, even if technically accurate.

Or these days, perhaps Utrecht would be in the running again, unlike when I lived there for a bit. There was a 12-lane street where there had once been a canal, but the canal has been put back in.[1]
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=587Ll81fyYU

https://eurocities.eu/stories/utrecht-from-car-to-boat/

Rotterdam is also de-Americanizing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXuI--ERWs4

certainly not bicylists. [1]
About a decade ago Antwerp won the best cycling award and as someone from the Netherlands who cycles in Antwerp almost every day let me tell you Antwerp's made great strides but it's late '80s Netherlands level at best. It's certainly a lot better than your video though!
This isn't entirely the fault of bad 1930s city planning. There had been some people in favor of American-style stroads for reasons I can't fathom (perhaps they'd never actually been on or near any in person?), so after the war they conveniently swept a bunch of ruins from German and Allied bombs alike into the canals and paved them over into "modern" streets. Brussels did something similar, and boy were they proud of destroying the city in time for the world's fair to show all of their beautiful wide car roads. All of which transformed Brussels into the worst city in the Benelux between roughly 1945-1955. I don't like being in Brussels much and you can clearly point to ca. 1950 as the singular cause. Thankfully they've been undoing the damage a bit in the past few years. Imagine how nice Brussels might've been if they'd started on this track in 1970 like Amsterdam instead of in 2015. Or if they'd simply never torn down the old Brussels. But it's never too late!

It's also really depressing if you look into the history of American cities a bit. For example in Chicago in the 1960s they'd commissioned an expert report as to what would happen if they tore down all the nice buildings and replaced them with wider streets and giant parking lots. The experts' conclusion was that it'd be a horrible idea, resulting in a giant loss of livability and tax income, but somehow they went ahead and did it anyway! And they didn't have the excuse that half the buildings on the street were in ruins from the bombs or anything like that either; at least in Rotterdam it made a lot of sense to just dump it all in the canals.

I'm actually looking forward to visiting Paris again someday (but my wife's like "there's a pandemic, I'm not going to the busiest city in the world right now") because they've made great strides over the past two years. It's only a little over 2 hours by high-speed rail, so it's not even all that different from going to Amsterdam for a day.
4
Yet you still prefix every function literally with function or function() which defeats the purpose of the naming convention.
Hardly, then you'd have to go looking for the definition every time you see it. :)
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DnD Central / Re: Climate Change and You
Last post by ersi -
Those EU nominations seem random. Judge for yourself how green the city is. The central parts have been widened and improved for sure during recent decades, but with buses and cars in mind, not necessarily pedestrians and certainly not bicylists. [1]


Tram 4 I use most of all of the city public transport. Actually I use trains more than anything else, but trains are considered countrywide transport. At 8:18 in the video, just when exiting from a tunnel, are the office buildings where I work.[2]
I think there is some trick to the nomination, either "green" is defined by the city itself or it depends on the mood of the commissars. This happens often with those EU things.
Well, I have been to the city only a few times during these covid years. I live outside the city and I used to commute by train, but I work near-exclusively remotely now.
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safe across updates
Randomly loading a file the way you proposed isn't very safe. :-)
I meant the file should be safe, so I would not have to re-apply my customisations after every update. Even Emacs can do it. If the upgrade is not backwards-compatible, treat the configfile as erroneous and load the defaults, which is probably safe enough.

Indeed not very hygienic when there is a proliferating culture of sharing customisations and you don't always read through every bit of code properly, but good for customisability and contributions from wider user base.

By the way, also camelCase is superugly.
I'm not a fan either. But it does serve a practical purpose, at least in KOReader. this_is_a_variable and thisIsAFunction so you can see it at a glance.
Yet you still prefix every function literally with function or function() which defeats the purpose of the naming convention. The use of camelCase causes headaches like ShowBookmap versus ShowBookMap, for example.
8
safe across updates
Randomly loading a file the way you proposed isn't very safe. :-)

By the way, also camelCase is superugly.
I'm not a fan either. But it does serve a practical purpose, at least in KOReader. this_is_a_variable and thisIsAFunction so you can see it at a glance.
9
Almost everyone who'd consider something like that tends to maintain a few patch files instead.
I see. That's really advanced, and it's actually long overdue I made it a normal everyday procedure for myself. Still, I like apps that are able to dump all of their changeable settings to a single editable configfile that stays safe across updates. The way defaults.persistent.lua is, it has some potential, but not nearly enough.

By the way, also camelCase is superugly.

Edit: Luckily such maintenance can be done inside Koreader, with some effort. In Kobo, I just opened Koreader's terminal emulator, ran cp frontend/apps/reader/modules/readergoto.lua frontend/apps/reader/modules/readergoto.lua.patched and, according to the text editor, it worked. According to type, there are also diff and patch onboard, but I'll try later if they work as expected.
10
Here's another idea. Instead of sifting through all those frontend files, which are far too many, would it be possible to permit advanced users to apply any and all changes, applicable to whatever part of the app, in a single file, something like defaults.persistent.lua? It may need some special syntax e.g. by declaring the frontend element or file that one wants to change and then spelling out the changes. And when there's something wrong in defaults.persistent.lua, the app would fall back to the official file in its historical location.
Almost everyone who'd consider something like that tends to maintain a few patch files instead.

- Strict formally required indentation (I cannot figure out from Lua documentation if this is the case, but the conventions of the code seem to indicate so), particularly when coupled with the use of tabs
Python requires indentation. Lua does not.