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91
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by OakdaleFTL -
The real example of Republican lunacy is everything anti-Democrat
Well, Dobbin, you've got your plot to plow... Do you ever wonder what the crop will be? :)
The Republican Party began as an anti-slavery (abolitionist) movement. That it supported the constitution and its Bill of Rights (and the Declaration's stance) is hardly surprising... The Post-Civil War amendments were (and are) important; Republican malfeasance and Democrat (Party) supported illegality (KKK and Jim Crow) kept the country from pursuing a staid course -- re-uniting a divided country.
The Wilson administration wss all that the Dems of today could want: Rampant government enforced racism, government censorship and "Ministry of Truth"-like powers to protect the administration, eugenics and abortion to keep power where it belongs, and the denigration and dilution of our "democratic" values -- traditions of self-government, free speech, religious toleration, the right of free assembly; and that bugaboo of the left, property rights.
(Not to mention the right to "keep and bear" arms, since authoritarians of all stripes abhor such...:)
To you, ersi, these are pretensions? Your superficiality is a bulwark against thinking and learning; but as long as you feel safe from upset (cognitive dissonance), your tutelage by Marxist ideology serves you well!!
I'm not surprised that you (and others) "buy" the "insurrection" scenario. That you think the Watergate fiasco was important, indeed, determinative of our politics, only highlights your superficiality...
[A]n extremely scandalous Republican power-grabbing conspiracy[,]
Watergate was a small group of "cowboys" playing "dirty tricks" à la the Democrats. And Nixon's misplaced loyalty cost him his presidency. And gave the country the Carter presidency...the definitive "Buyer's Remorse" election.

Yes, my self-identification as "alt-right" was more than a little tongue-in-cheek: But Paleoconservative doesn't have the same cachet... (Know your audience!) I write as an American, which seems to irritate some folk. (Indeed, some are still so anti-America that even Biblical proscriptions -something about "motes and beams" (Matthew 7:5)- fail to admonish or correct...) If I take it right: Only when Americans exhibit all of the worst traits of Europeans will we be accepted as equals!?
Sorry to disappoint the old guard, but we've got our own problems to deal with... And pleasing the remnant of a past nobility, placating its pretensions of power and pacifying its penchant for precarious alliances should nor be the focus of U.S., foreign policy.
92
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by Frenzie -
whose main distinguishing feature is isolationism (the foreign policy is to stick the head in sand and keep it there), has had no representatives in higher power for over a century.
That sounds fairly apropos...  :lol: Perhaps more sticking fingers in the ears and shouting some nonsense rather than head in the sand.
93
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by ersi -
As I said earlier, I think it silently started with Watergate, which was an extremely scandalous Republican power-grabbing conspiracy. They have been trying to mount something equally scandalous against Democrats ever since, which only takes the entire country down the spiral.
What about interpreting it as a resurgence of the Old Right? It's always remained as a minority.
Oh, it never occurred to me. And rightly so, because Old Right, whose main distinguishing feature is isolationism (the foreign policy is to stick the head in sand and keep it there), has had no representatives in higher power for over a century. Therefore they can be rightly neglected as any sort of influence.

Nixon's right-hand man was Kissinger, definitely a man who made a difference on the world arena. For example, it was Kissinger who recognised Mao's China as a country and frustrated the ambitions of Taiwan. So he was not an Old Right guy.

At some point Oakdale identified as alt right. Not sure if he properly qualifies though.
94
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by Frenzie -
I refuse to be dragged into the Republican-radical culture war, it is froth, turbulence, and waste of energy. "Intersectionality" is somewhat fact-based, though when the word is broached, it's a flag that what follows has a non-zero probability of being nonsense.
Intersectionality merely means that an individual can be affected by multiple types of discrimination and disadvantages. Which is beyond obvious, but better phrased it's the study of that phenomenon. Some people have really, really weird ideas about that, roughly the equivalent of thinking that focusing on biology entails you think there's no such thing as history.

And another important note there, the fact of intersectionality doesn't imply any specific course of action.

It's indeed similar to evolution and climate change. Some people don't like the real or imagined policy implications of the facts, so instead of defending why we should do nothing (which may well be a valid position) they make the wackadoodle claim that nothing's happening at all.

As I said earlier, I think it silently started with Watergate, which was an extremely scandalous Republican power-grabbing conspiracy. They have been trying to mount something equally scandalous against Democrats ever since, which only takes the entire country down the spiral.
What about interpreting it as a resurgence of the Old Right? It's always remained as a minority.
95
DnD Central / Re: What's Going on in the Americas?
Last post by ersi -
Verizon sells internet trailblazers Yahoo and AOL for $5B
Wireless company Verizon will sell Verizon Media, which consists of the once-pioneering tech platforms, to Apollo Global Management in a $5 billion deal.

Verizon said Monday that it will keep a 10% stake in the new company, which will be called Yahoo.

[...]

Verizon spent about $9 billion buying AOL and Yahoo over two years starting in 2015, hoping to jump-start a digital media business that would compete with Google and Facebook. It didn't work...
It's because Marissa Mayer did a good job. Her job was to kill Yahoo so that it never recovers. Something like Microsoft has done to Nokia and Skype.
96
Hobbies & Entertainment / Re: Model railroads
Last post by ersi -
Model trains can be pretty.


But Guinness records are increasingly pointless.


97
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by ersi -
I consider catering to evolution denial to be a milestone, remember  Bantay, not because it mattered that much in itself, it only meant that Republicans would be less likely to be biologists. But it led to party increasingly less comfortable with science, and we can draw a line from there to GQP.
The intelligent design bunch is not inherently a Republican feature, but rather a function of American evangelicals looking for a political home. Evangelical values are anti-evolution (as in officially mandated pro-Old Testament history and science classes in school), pro-homeschooling, anti-abortion (as in abortion must be forbidden to all, plain and simple), anti-gay marriage, pro-Christian values (as in the state must serve as the guarantor and protector of Christian denominations, nevermind the separation of church and state) etc.

I'd say that none of this is inherently Republican. When Republicans are in power, such as most recently with Trump, they spew some pro-church rhetoric to gain the evangelical vote, but they do not enforce any of the relevant policies when in power. Evangelicals hope, wish, and think they hear promises in the wanted direction, but none of it is actually happening. What is happening under Republicans is tax cuts for the rich, which jibes well with the American prosperity gospel and tax exemption as a supposed constitutional right for churches - this may be the only actual inherent touching point between evangelicals and Republicans.

So, it is more like evangelicals are a big bunch, they feel their power receding in the modern world, so they are looking for a strong political home. A hundred years ago their natural home was the Democrat party, given that Southern Baptists are historically also pro-slavery.

The real example of Republican lunacy is everything anti-Democrat and pro-Trump. Being anti-other party just for the sake of it in a two-party system is divisive for no good purpose; it is basically against the balance of powers in the country. And Trump is a loon who still disputes the elections that he won against Hillary (he thinks he won the popular vote there too), not to mention the re-election that he lost, and who directed the mob to attack another branch of government to explicitly disrupt the closing procedure of the electoral college vote. This is absolutely indefensible, but there are astonishingly many defenders of Trump in the party. So, I'd say all pretension of constitutional values, due process, law and order has been lost among Republicans. This is (some of) the lunacy in the party.

As I said earlier, I think it silently started with Watergate, which was an extremely scandalous Republican power-grabbing conspiracy. They have been trying to mount something equally scandalous against Democrats ever since, which only takes the entire country down the spiral.

Edit: I could have made the basic point very much shorter - there is nothing in common between Bantay and Oakdale. Bantay is Bantay, but Oakdale is like this. It is a quote from some nonsensical ramble, accompanied with ultrabrief commentary completely indecipherable for anyone who is not in the same bubble. I even doubt it makes any sense within the bubble. Anyway, Oakdale's thrust is political, invariably in favour of the Republican party, 100% partisan. Bantay's main thrust was religious, hardly any overlap with any major Republican representative or partisan. Is Trump religious? Possibly a tiny little bit, but considerably less than Biden.
98
DnD Central / Re: The Problem with Atheism
Last post by jax -
What, pray tell, is the "lunacy" of which you speak? (Try not to get all "intersectionality-ish" when you try to explain what you meant: Just the facts, man; just the facts.:)

Current antics by leading members, or for that matter rank and file, of the Republican party. Of course crazy people vote, and it is in the parties' interest that as many vote for them as possible, crazy or not. But they are usually not allowed to rise in the party proper, not in great numbers anyway. The Southern Strategy may be the Republican party's iacta alea est, but catering to science denial sped up their downfall.

Fact resistance is not inherently to either side of the political axis, and it is easy to find cases all over the landscape. But the GOP soaked them all up. I consider catering to evolution denial to be a milestone, remember  Bantay, not because it mattered that much in itself, it only meant that Republicans would be less likely to be biologists. But it led to party increasingly less comfortable with science, and we can draw a line from there to GQP.

I refuse to be dragged into the Republican-radical culture war, it is froth, turbulence, and waste of energy. "Intersectionality" is somewhat fact-based, though when the word is broached, it's a flag that what follows has a non-zero probability of being nonsense.
99
https://youtu.be/eM4otIAZIps
Cannot be done as long as the Baltic Sea remains under Nord Stream. Nord Stream means the EU gave the Baltic Sea away, possibly irrevocably, and nothing sustainable can be done there.
100
DnD Central / Re: India rising
Last post by ersi -
India will need to:

1. Recover from covid
2. Counter the Belt and Road Initiative somehow