The DnD Sanctuary

General => Hobbies & Entertainment => Topic started by: Frenzie on 2013-12-18, 16:23:02

Title: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-18, 16:23:02
Do you like to cook? I do. I also like to watch some cooking shows occasionally. Gennaro (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lBX10drV6A0&list=PLcpoB2VESJmc0U_EEor31BfM1TKjo1h6i&index=4) is one of my favorites.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2013-12-18, 18:38:42
I am vegetarian. Even though I don't care about cooking, I am forced to, because in this country it's near-impossible to get vegetarian food. I even invented a recipe of my own.

Seems so that if you care about what you eat, you have to cook your own food to some extent. I even used to grow my own food. I was born to a family of farmers.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-18, 18:53:46
I'm not strictly a vegetarian, but seeing how I don't tend to eat meat it's usually easier to say I am.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2013-12-18, 19:03:24
I'm not strictly vegetarian either, but I should be. More precisely I'm pescetarian. Non-eating is easy for me, but unfortunately I have family etc. It's not nice to inconvenience them by starving myself to death.

Btw, the recipe I invented myself is a kind of mix of cheese soup and rice porridge. Do you have some simple and convenient vegetarian recipes you have tried and can recommend?
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-18, 19:57:57
The base of most of my cooking tends to be onion, garlic, and mushrooms stir-fried in some (olive) oil. You can pretty much take that in any direction you want, depending on the vegetables and herbs you add.

A direction that rates highly on my convenience factor is to add e.g. some green beans and some peas, or whatever vegetables are easily available to you. After stir frying the whole thing for a couple of minutes, add (part of) a jar of tomato chunks, and while that's heating up add some seasoning (salt, pepper, oregano, basil, whatever rocks your boat). By the time you're done adding the seasonings and stirring it all in, the dish will be done. Then you have a sort of tomato soup you can eat with some bread on the side, or if you boiled some pasta in the meantime you've got a pasta dish. All that within about 10 minutes. If you want to eat it with e.g. lentils just be sure to start those on time, but besides that it takes no extra effort.

I imagine I'm not telling you much, if anything, you don't already know. But if I am, I'll be glad to share some other possible directions.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-19, 07:57:44
I like to cook and make recipes on the fly. I'm big on soups. Just yesterday I bought a package of hulled barley to make some beef barley soup.

I also like to dabble with assorted pasta dishes. I have the ingredients for lasagna, which I'll make this weekend. And also the necessities for a Middle Eastern dish that I've been making...not often...for a long time, green beans (string beans) and lamb.

Anybody like chili? Got a good recipe?
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-19, 07:59:57
After stir frying the whole thing for a couple of minutes

That reminds me of another favorite, fried rice.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Belfrager on 2013-12-19, 09:04:39
I'm not a vegetarian and I don't understand vegetarians.
Man is naturally omnivorous, as teeth disposition and shape, as well as the digestive system clearly shows.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-19, 09:28:32
I suspect that one of the roots of vegetarianism is the belief that all critters are related, and that eating meat is like eating a relative or friend. And that pain inflicted on an animal...not us, of course, because we're not animals...is akin to pain inflicted on a friend or relative.

Personally, being a soft-hearted, kind and loving person, I can't bear the thought of a carrot ruthlessly pulled from the ground, its root hairs snapping.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Macallan on 2013-12-19, 12:12:40

Do you like to cook? I do.

I do most of the cooking here.


I also like to watch some cooking shows occasionally.

The only one worth watching is this (http://www.youtube.com/user/SwedishMealTime) :left: :viking:
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-19, 13:32:53
I watched it for a bit, but it got somewhat old. :P
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Banned Member on 2013-12-19, 18:18:30
What a human being likes to eat corresponds to what his/her organism is lacking at the time.
For example, I eat buckwheat twice a year or so - when my biosystem gets to require iron.
(https://thedndsanctuary.eu/imagecache.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Ffiles.myopera.com%2FJoshL%2Fsml0%2Flol.gif&hash=5658d6826764d1940175c65c6fc2a07d" rel="cached" data-warn="External image, click here to view original" data-url="http://files.myopera.com/JoshL/sml0/lol.gif)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: mjmsprt40 on 2013-12-19, 19:51:59
I used to do quite a bit more cooking than I do these days. Since the last move (March of 2012) my cooking has been pretty sporadic. Mostly, the landlord brings stuff in from the fast-food? franchises around here and we eat that. Every now and then I rebel however, and a few dirty dishes and the sound of the smoke-detector is my reward for a halfway decent meal.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-19, 20:39:15
the sound of the smoke-detector

Boy, what are you cooking? :D
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2013-12-19, 22:03:16

I'm not a vegetarian and I don't understand vegetarians.
Man is naturally omnivorous, as teeth disposition and shape, as well as the digestive system clearly shows.
It's a funny thing. Most of the time during the day we don't eat. We do all sorts of other things. Then again, we (tend to) eat every day. (I don't eat every day, but I don't know anyone else like me, so I can't say the world is weird. It must be something with me.) So, are we eaters or are we not? It's said we eat to live, but in reality we live just a couple of hours and then we fall back to eating again. Pointless vicious circle.



The base of most of my cooking tends to be onion, garlic, and mushrooms stir-fried in some (olive) oil. You can pretty much take that in any direction you want, depending on the vegetables and herbs you add.

Right. Already here shows the big difference between a cook and a non-cook. I don't have "the base of my cooking". I eat whatever is universally edible. I care little beyond this.

As to my totally unique recipe, I had these initial requirements:
- Simple ingredients (available at any grocery store, no additives)
- No weird utensils or cooking tricks, just a knife, stove, pot and/or a pan
- Can be kept overnight and warmed up again

I like cheese soups and I studied the recipes to get ideas. There was a problem with all the recipes. It seems that cheese soups invariably require bouillon cubes. This is already an additive and goes beyond the requirement of simple ingredients. So I began forcibly experimenting by melting cheese in warm milk. Most cheeses turn into ugly clumps this way, but I found some smoked cheeses that don't. Some types of smoked cheese melt evenly. So I settled with those.

So, this is the "base" of the cheese soup part: Smoked cheese melted in warm milk. Nothing else. Literally.

Then there's the rice porridge part. It's just cooked rice. Nothing else. Literally. I mix freshly cooked rice in the milk-cheese. If the density doesn't come out right (too fluid usually) then I add crumbs of bread too. Black rye bread of course. This is the only bread I acknowledge.  

And this is it. No salt even. The cheese contains enough salt of its own. With sufficiently thick density, the leftovers can be kept overnight in the fridge and warmed up on a pan for next meal. This of course gives rise to the last ingredient: some grease or oil on the pan.


I imagine I'm not telling you much, if anything, you don't already know. But if I am, I'll be glad to share some other possible directions.
You told me a bunch of stuff beyond my level. I don't understand the idea of seasonings and "whatever rocks your boat". I eat to be able to stand up, not to get rocked. The idea of having base ingredients and then taking this to some "direction" when cooking seems reasonable, but my base is evidently too basic and everything beyond it is too complicated for me.

Our approach to food is diametrically opposite. You watch your diet to get full and tasty meals. I watch my diet to avoid things that are too weird or directly harmful. If I could, I would avoid eating altogether. Eating is a nuisance.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: SmileyFaze on 2013-12-19, 22:50:51
Nothing beats a good ole fashioned BBQ (https://www.smileyfaze.tk/slides/bbq.gif) ...... steaks, chops, fish, eggs & bacon, sausages (pork just to piss off Mohammud & his clan of bottom dwellers), shrimp, roast corn, hamburgers, franks, etc,,,etc,,,,etc!!!
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-20, 08:40:39
It seems that cheese soups invariably require bouillon cubes.

Depending on the ingredients, bouillon cubes can be alright. If you want to be sure it's decent, you can make your own stock. In a sense you're already doing that, but I'd try boiling some onion in the milk prior to adding the cheese or perhaps simply alongside for some extra flavor. If you didn't get the message by now, I love onions. ;) Best of all, onions are also some of the most convenient, healthiest, and cheapest vegetables. But I'd probably add a bunch of other veggies too.

I watch my diet to avoid things that are too weird or directly harmful.

Shouldn't everyone? :)

If I could, I would avoid eating altogether. Eating is a nuisance.

It can be. Especially in the morning. But at night, surely it's some nice time to spend with your family?
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-20, 09:26:03
It can be. Especially in the morning. But at night, surely it's some nice time to spend with your family?

Of course...in my case that would be my wife and I who spend all day every day with each other.

Question...how do I access smilies when posting this, or any, entry? I don't see any.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-20, 09:50:43
Of course...in my case that would be my wife and I who spend all day every day with each other.

True, but still you're both busy during most of the day, even if it's just reading a book.

Question...how do I access smilies when posting this, or any, entry? I don't see any.

Click preview to get access to the full composer. :)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Belfrager on 2013-12-20, 09:56:34
Quote from: ersi
It's a funny thing. Most of the time during the day we don't eat. We do all sorts of other things. Then again, we (tend to) eat every day. (I don't eat every day, but I don't know anyone else like me, so I can't say the world is weird. It must be something with me.) So, are we eaters or are we not? It's said we eat to live, but in reality we live just a couple of hours and then we fall back to eating again. Pointless vicious circle.

So... you don't eat everyday... original, I must say.
Well, what you call a "pointless vicious circle" is nothing but the very definition of organic life. You need energy to stay alive, you get such energy from food's digestion and nowhere else. You don't eat, you die.

A different matter would be the pleasure that people takes from eating, which is the base of culinary/gastronomy and a characteristic that defines people's cultures.
It varies very much from person to person and it ranges from those that eating it's a burden ( your case? :) ) to those that lives just for eating.

I prefer very much to eat tasty food, on small quantities and from different things, at each meal. Turning gourmet.
Another thing it's the availability one has for other's food. When out of the country I always insist on eating the local food and experiment their specialities.

It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-20, 10:07:49
Well, what you call a "pointless vicious circle" is nothing but the very definition of organic life.

How atheist of you. :P

It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.

Presumably you shouldn't have to worry about them even entering your restaurant?
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Belfrager on 2013-12-20, 10:28:29
Quote from: Frenzie

Well, what you call a "pointless vicious circle" is nothing but the very definition of organic life.

How atheist of you. :P


At Fridays, I always feel a bit atheist  >:(
Anyway, I said "organic" life, not spiritual, so don't start commemorating... :)

Quote from: Frenzie

It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.

Presumably you shouldn't have to worry about them even entering your restaurant?


Oh but they do!
Specially the British, they want to bring Great Britain with them. Why do they travel so much instead of staying home, it's a mystery.

Other tourists are usually not like that, a much open mind. Including the Americans that have always surprised me, very open mind and curious about everything, I like them.
Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...

Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-20, 11:09:07
Your description of the British reminds me of Colin Farrel's character in In Bruges (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0780536/). It's decent; basically a kind of movie adaptation of The Dumb Waiter.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Macallan on 2013-12-20, 13:38:57

Quote from: Frenzie

Well, what you call a "pointless vicious circle" is nothing but the very definition of organic life.

How atheist of you. :P


At Fridays, I always feel a bit atheist  >:(
Anyway, I said "organic" life, not spiritual, so don't start commemorating... :)

Baby steps :right:


Quote from: Frenzie

It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.

Presumably you shouldn't have to worry about them even entering your restaurant?


Oh but they do!
Specially the British, they want to bring Great Britain with them. Why do they travel so much instead of staying home, it's a mystery.

Beats the hell out of me. Presumably there's a german restaurant somewhere not far from here, people keep telling me about it when they find out where I'm from. But why in Cthulhu's name would I want to go there? I'm not exactly home sick, and what I miss about Berlin is the diversity, certainly not cliche german food.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-20, 14:56:33
I just walked home, which is about 3 to 4km, and felt somewhat hungry. Since it's still a few hours till dinner, what I whipped up looks like this:



This is what Dutch people call an uitsmijter (outthrower), and what German people call a Strammer Max (stiff Max; sounds more like slang for penis but I guess Germans are weird or maybe I'm missing a joke).

NB This hardly qualifies as cooking, but I use it to illustrate how easy it is to add some gastronomic and nutritional value to a quick meal. Because the egg fries while you prepare the other ingredients, it doesn't really take any longer than a simple cheese sandwich. Note that there's absolutely nothing wrong with a simple cheese sandwich. I just want to emphasize that there isn't some huge chore involved.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Banned Member on 2013-12-20, 15:34:08
Who's read some ersi here, the guy must be that very guru who troubled MyOpera not so long ago! :P:D
And Bel, what if his metabolism is a sort of that of a plant? You said "organic life"? Plants are organic too, and seeing my windowsill cacti for quite awhile, I can assure you - if they eat at all, their stuff must be mostly minerals from the turf and occasional "nawóz do kaktusów i sukulentów". What they like most is light - which they must use to produce carbo-molecules to fill themselves with more green flesh!:D
Title: Re: Food
Post by: SmileyFaze on 2013-12-21, 04:11:14
....the Americans that have always surprised me, very open mind and curious about everything, I like them.  Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...


Most Americans don't travel because they can't be bothered, they're quite content at home. " I'll watch the video......"

Then there are those that can't afford to travel, because with the present occupant in the White House, one never knows where the future economy will go, or where it's gone has left them high & dry.

Traveling overseas is considered overrated to many, & is considered a luxury to some.....way down on the list of importance compared to what Americans see as enjoyable. 

Those that do trek out are usually quite comfortable economically, & are always into having something to talk about when they get home.....especially the ladies....love to brag how much money they spent much to the chagrin of their friends.

Personally, I travel for most of the year (retired), & 90% of that travel is overseas.......my favorite spots are the Islands in the South Pacific.

As far as food......as long as it doesn't stare back at me when I'm eatin' it, or as long as it isn't what over 75% of the world would consider as great fishin' bait, I'd give it a go! (https://www.smileyfaze.tk/slides/chuckle002.gif)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-26, 15:19:05
I watched it for a bit, but it got somewhat old.

In about thirty seconds.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-26, 15:26:15
It repugnates me when I see that kind of tourists that wants to eat what they eat back in home. If I had a restaurant I would not serve them anything at all.

A couple of your favorite Portuguese dishes. I like to try new things.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-26, 15:45:54
I had something like the below a couple of days...oats done in the oven with strawberries, raspberries and bananas. It was very nice. My daughter made it for a Christmas morning breakfast. I'm going to try it with raisins, cranberries and pine nuts.
http://www.skinnytaste.com/2012/01/baked-oatmeal-with-blueberries-and.html (http://www.skinnytaste.com/2012/01/baked-oatmeal-with-blueberries-and.html)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-26, 15:53:04
As far as food......as long as it doesn't stare back at me when I'm eatin' it, or as long as it isn't what over 75% of the world would consider as great fishin' bait, I'd give it a go!

Me, too.
:)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2013-12-26, 16:36:34
How about some food porn via South Korea?
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/south-korea/131220/mok-bang-dinner-porn-internet (http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/asia-pacific/south-korea/131220/mok-bang-dinner-porn-internet)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2013-12-31, 11:47:29
Today's lunch hardly qualifies as cooking either, but I think it was a successful experiment.

Ingredients:

I fried the egg over medium, and right after flipping it over I put the two tortillas on top to heat them up. Meanwhile I sliced open the avocado, after which flipped the tortillas around to heat them from the other side. I subsequently put a plate, knife, and spoon into position, and took the sprouts out of the fridge. By that time the egg was done, so I transfered the tortillas and egg to the plate, sliced the egg in two to put half in the top middle of each tortillas, and divided the avocado on top. To finish I "garnished" it with copious amounts of sprouts.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Sanguinemoon on 2014-01-01, 07:42:46
Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...
Hint: there's no such thing, Large and diverse country and all that. Attitudes differ greatly, often depending the region or sub-region of the country. America also has an image problem of a lot of people with open mouths and closed minds, often in the South East that give the rest of us a bad name.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: string on 2014-01-01, 11:42:38

Today's lunch hardly qualifies as cooking either, but I think it was a successful experiment.

Ingredients:

  • 1 or 2 eggs (I used one fairly large egg)
  • 1 avocado
  • a bunch of sprouts (I used alfalfa, leek, and radish)
  • 2 medium-sized tortillas

I fried the egg over medium, and right after flipping it over I put the two tortillas on top to heat them up. Meanwhile I sliced open the avocado, after which flipped the tortillas around to heat them from the other side. I subsequently put a plate, knife, and spoon into position, and took the sprouts out of the fridge. By that time the egg was done, so I transfered the tortillas and egg to the plate, sliced the egg in two to put half in the top middle of each tortillas, and divided the avocado on top. To finish I "garnished" it with copious amounts of sprouts.

I found that a bit unnerving.

I hope you're feeling much better now.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-01-01, 12:01:23
I found that a bit unnerving.

That coming from the man who eats fried kipper for breakfast. :lol:  ;D
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Belfrager on 2014-01-01, 12:33:47

Course the Americans that travels here aren't surely the average American...
Hint: there's no such thing, Large and diverse country and all that. Attitudes differ greatly, often depending the region or sub-region of the country. America also has an image problem of a lot of people with open mouths and closed minds, often in the South East that give the rest of us a bad name.

I know that (well, except the South East part...).

I meant what I said. For the minority that by cultural, artistic, historic, gastronomic, you-name-it reasons of Americans are interested in visiting Europe, just a small minority amongst that minority wants expressly to visit Portugal. Those are not ordinary, mass tourism people. American crème de la crème. :)

Increasing every year, by the way. It must be for my posts... :)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2014-01-03, 08:43:21
Depending on the ingredients, bouillon cubes can be alright. If you want to be sure it's decent, you can make your own stock.

Bouillon cubes :o >:(

I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice.  ;D
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2014-01-03, 09:32:05
Decades ago I worked in Korea for a couple of years and learned to eat things I'd never dreamed of before.

Most of my compatriots never ventured outside the small compound we lived in, but I made local friends and ate out frequently. One of the things that I came to like was a pickled and fermented cabbage dish called kimchi...hot, hot, hot. I still buy some from time to time. In Korea, kimchi is god, even in N. Korea.

Take a look at the Kimchi festival where Korean women are making 25 tons of the delicacy.
http://www.weather.com/travel/korean-women-make-25-tons-kimchi-poor-photos-20131118 (http://www.weather.com/travel/korean-women-make-25-tons-kimchi-poor-photos-20131118)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-01-03, 09:40:56
So it's like a spicy zuurkool (sour cole/cabbage, i.e. Sauerkraut)? Just last night I spiced up my zuurkool with some jalapeño peppers.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2014-01-03, 10:02:41

So it's like a spicy zuurkool (sour cole/cabbage, i.e. Sauerkraut)? Just last night I spiced up my zuurkool with some jalapeño peppers.

Doesn't look like Sauerkraut to me, even though I'm sure it must stink strong http://s.imwx.com/dru/2013/11/c1a9221f-253e-4110-b149-8948ac928416_650x366.jpg
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-01-03, 10:14:13
Well sure, they use Chinese cabbage (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_cabbage) (apparently called Napa cabbage in English) instead of some variety of white cabbage, and they don't cut it up. Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.

Edit: English Wikipedia sources a similar statement from http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/vegetables/a/sauerkraut.htm
Title: Re: Food
Post by: krake on 2014-01-03, 10:36:50

Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.


Indeed, now that you mention it, I remember how I enjoined "varza murata (http://ginuca27.blogspot.de/2008/01/sarmale-in-foi-de-varza-murata.html)" in Romania and "savanyú káposzta (http://www.nosalty.hu/alapanyag/savanyu-kaposzta)" in Hungary.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2014-01-03, 10:51:04


Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.


Indeed, now that you mention it, I remember how I enjoined "varza murata (http://ginuca27.blogspot.de/2008/01/sarmale-in-foi-de-varza-murata.html)" in Romania and "savanyú káposzta (http://www.nosalty.hu/alapanyag/savanyu-kaposzta)" in Hungary.

Here's the Russian variety (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9f/Kvaschennaja-kapusta.jpg/720px-Kvaschennaja-kapusta.jpg). In Siberia they touch Mongolia. Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: krake on 2014-01-03, 11:21:49

Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.

As far as I can tell, the big difference lies in the way the suerkraut was fermented, industrially or naturally matured in wood barrels.
You hardly can find the naturally matured one at the supermarket ;)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: ersi on 2014-01-03, 11:29:56


Still, I vastly prefer the Estonian variety (must be close to German) over Russian.

As far as I can tell, the big difference lies in the way the suerkraut was fermented, industrially or naturally matured in wood barrels.
You hardly can find the naturally matured one at the supermarket ;)
Right, I mean the wood barrel one. This is totally Estonian (or German if you wish).

The Russian one in the picture I linked is called "Siberian or Far East variety" on Russian Wikipedia, "which contains carrot in distinction from the variety used in European Russia." (Not so) oddly, we have carrot added to near-raw cabbage in our supermarkets too. I still refuse to call it sauerkraut, even though they do.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: krake on 2014-01-03, 11:46:17
Right, I mean the wood barrel one. This is totally Estonian (or German if you wish).

I wouldn't call it neither Estonian nor German. It's simply the original and best tasting. Anything else is a cheap knock off.
You'll get served that  cheap knock off even in German restaurants.
I can't tell about restaurants for billionaires though.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: SmileyFaze on 2014-01-04, 02:45:43
I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I save all my carrot tops, skins, celery bits & leaves, tomato bits, & most all veggi parts & bits (except onion skins & potato skins), any bones, chicken skins, & fat trimmings. The more chicken & meat bones you have the better.

I put them in a freezer bag.

When there's a full bag or full bags, I put a quart of water into my 10 qt. Pressure Cooker, then all the bits I can jam in there ....... salt & pepper & any spice that makes sense ........ cook it on medium for about an hour or so ..... let it cool......

Then I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-01-04, 08:48:41
I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays

We do the same thing. :)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2014-01-04, 09:35:40

I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I save all my carrot tops, skins, celery bits & leaves, tomato bits, & most all veggi parts & bits (except onion skins & potato skins), any bones, chicken skins, & fat trimmings. The more chicken & meat bones you have the better.

I put them in a freezer bag.

When there's a full bag or full bags, I put a quart of water into my 10 qt. Pressure Cooker, then all the bits I can jam in there ....... salt & pepper & any spice that makes sense ........ cook it on medium for about an hour or so ..... let it cool......

Then I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.


I made a very large pot of chicken stock yesterday and saved it in freezer bags for later use. A taste test indicated that the result was very nice. :)


I strain into another pot....chuck the bits minus bones into the worm farm .... then I pour the broth/stock into ice cube trays, & when frozen, into a well marked freezer bag for future use.


That's basically what I do, but don't use ice cube trays. When the stock pot has cooled, I strain it and fill the bags, which go into the freezer for later use.

The chicken bits, which are of no use to me, also go into bags for later consumption by our dog, Sebastian. My wife eats the bones.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: SmileyFaze on 2014-01-05, 00:18:30
My wife eats the bones.


Wohhhh.....Gnarly Dude!!  (https://thedndsanctuary.eu/imagecache.php?image=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.smiley-lol.com%2Fsmiley%2Fheureux%2Flollarge.gif&hash=cc78d35b88dd655637714b01138a1063" rel="cached" data-warn="External image, click here to view original" data-url="http://www.smiley-lol.com/smiley/heureux/lollarge.gif)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Jimbro3738 on 2014-01-05, 13:16:36
Quote from: Jimbro3738 on 2014-01-04, 22:35:40My wife eats the bones.Wohhhh.....Gnarly Dude!!

Perhaps I put that a tad wrong. You see, what I actually meant was...never mind...too much trouble.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-03-04, 15:09:30
Not everyone cooks their food:

Title: Re: Food
Post by: Colonel Rebel on 2014-03-09, 22:50:29
Always have been a fan of making Mac 'N Cheese when I am hungry.
Quick, simple, and delicious.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Macallan on 2014-03-12, 09:22:40

Always have been a fan of making Mac 'N Cheese when I am hungry.
Quick, simple, and delicious.

You should try the klingon original (http://www.whatsforlunchhoney.net/2006/04/allgaeuer-kaesespaetzle-cheese.html) if you get a chance :chef:
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2014-03-12, 09:34:56
There's a video recipe available by celebrity chef Hannah Hart:


(she also did the American adaptation)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: jax on 2014-03-12, 21:44:29
Dutch Wikipedia makes some unsourced claims that Sauerkraut might've originated in northern China, was taken along to eastern Europe by the Mongols, and made its way from there across Germany to the Netherlands with Ashkenazi refugees.


I wouldn't make such a claim, but the sauerkraut you get in North-East China, indeed several North-Eastern dishes, are practically indistinguishable  from the European varieties.

There are dialectal differences in Europe, mostly on how sour the sauerkraut is to be, and the Chinese variety is pretty much in the middle.

Kim-chi is different. It has retained more of the cabbage nature (not the same transparent soft thing), and of course it is more spicy. It's not particularly smelly.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2016-01-17, 16:34:47
Because a liter package of coconut milk is almost a Euro per liter cheaper and I really do quite like coconut milk, I had some in the fridge yesterday because I don't use a whole liter all at once. While obviously I knew that coconut milk solidifies -- it already does so at regular (winter) room temperature -- I discovered that this chilled coconut milk is quite simply coconut ice cream. Quite good, too. Surprisingly sweet at less than 3 grams of natural sugars, although obviously coconut also has plenty of fat in it. ;)
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Belfrager on 2016-02-20, 12:03:13
I'm absolutely tired with all these "chefs" and their food "culture" and personal marketing.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: jax on 2016-03-05, 21:51:28
Not on YouTube, but Vegorätt  (http://www.svtplay.se/video/6056391/vegoratt/vegoratt-sasong-1-avsnitt-2?start=auto)(Vegodish) is somewhat different.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2016-03-06, 10:24:25
A quick peek suggests it might be a bit of a "how to prepare just about anything that grows" kind of show, which is something I wouldn't mind watching.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Mr. Tennessee on 2017-02-18, 13:34:04

Chicken Wings in Peanut Sauce
Total:1 hrActive: 15 min
Yield: 4 servings
Level: Easy
Ingredients

Wings:
4 pound chicken wings, halved at joint, tips removed if desired
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 1/2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
1 garlic clove, minced
Sauce:
2 tablespoons natural peanut butter
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 1/2 teaspoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes
1/4 teaspoon salt
To make Wings: Preheat oven to 500 degrees F.

Pat wings dry and toss with oil, ginger, and garlic. Arrange wings, thick-skin sides up, in 1 layer in a large shallow baking pan and roast in upper third of oven 25 minutes.

Turn on broiler and broil wings, turning once, until nicely browned and crisp, 10 to 15 minutes.

To make sauce while wings cook: Whisk together sauce ingredients in a large bowl until blended.

Add wings to sauce and toss until coated.
=====
I made this recipe earlier in the week. Delicious.
Should be good with fried rice, which I will try next time I make it.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Mr. Tennessee on 2017-02-18, 13:48:53
I'm making this tonight.
========
Pasta Shells with Peas and Ham


TOTAL TIME: 30 MIN SERVINGS: 4
INGREDIENTS

1 pound small pasta shells or elbow macaroni...I'm using the shells
2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil
5 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
One 10-ounce package frozen peas
1/4 pound thinly sliced prosciutto, coarsely chopped
1 1/4 cups heavy cream
1 cup chicken stock or low-sodium broth
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
1/3 cup chopped dill
Salt and freshly ground pepper

In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the pasta shells until al dente. Drain the shells, return them to the pot and toss with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil to prevent sticking.

Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Add the garlic and cook over moderate heat until golden, about 4 minutes. Add the peas and prosciutto and cook until the peas are hot and the prosciutto is lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the cream and stock and simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes.

Stir the cream sauce into the shells. Add the Parmesan and season with salt and pepper.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2017-02-18, 13:52:38
Because a liter package of coconut milk is almost a Euro per liter cheaper and I really do quite like coconut milk
I have since discovered that creamed coconut, mostly to be found in bio (organic) stores is better and cheaper. It doesn't come with any stabilizers or other flavor-decreasing though otherwise harmless additives, plus the ability to use it more concentrated gives you more versatility.

The more expensive Rapunzel creamed coconut more or less competes in price with the packages and cans while Amaizin is almost half the price.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Mr. Tennessee on 2017-02-27, 20:44:36
I'm a fan of unhealthy foods. If you are too, you might like this recipe.
===========
This mac 'n' cheese, adapted from the book "Real Food Has Curves" by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough, is quicker and easier to make than the classic casserole. It is hearty comfort food that easily functions as a main dish for vegetarians.

Featured in: Vegetarian Comfort Food At Thanksgiving.

Kosher, Nut Free, Vegetarian, Broccoli, Macaroni, Mushroom  Mark as  Cooked  92 ratings 
INGREDIENTS
4 ounces grated Cheddar
2 ounces finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or other hard cheese
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
1 small yellow onion, chopped
6 ounces cremini or white button mushrooms, sliced
3 tablespoons unbleached all-purpose flour
3 cups low-fat or fat-free milk
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon minced tarragon leaves or 2 teaspoons dried tarragon
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
8 ounces dried whole-wheat pasta shells (not the large ones for stuffing), cooked and drained according to the package instructions
4 cups small broccoli florets, cooked in boiling water for 1 minute (broccoli can be added to the pasta during the last minute of cooking, then drained with the pasta in a colander)
 Nutritional Information
PREPARATION
Mix the Cheddar and Parmigiano-Reggiano in a medium bowl. Set aside.
Melt the butter in a large, high-sided, oven-safe skillet. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until softened, about 3 minutes.
Add the mushrooms and cook until they release their liquid and it comes to a simmer, and then reduces by about two-thirds, about 5 minutes.
Sprinkle the flour over the vegetables in the skillet. Stir well to coat.
Whisk in the milk in a steady, thin stream until creamy. Then whisk in the mustard, tarragon, salt and pepper. Continue whisking until the mixture starts to bubble and the liquid thickens, about 3 minutes
Remove the skillet from the heat. Stir in three-quarters of the mixed cheeses until smooth. Then stir in the cooked pasta and broccoli.
Preheat the broiler after setting the rack 4 to 6 inches from the heat source. Meanwhile, sprinkle the remaining cheese over the ingredients in the skillet. Set the skillet on the rack and broil until light browned and bubbling, about 5 minutes. (If your skillet has a plastic or wooden handle, make sure it sticks outside the oven, out from under the broiler, so the handle doesn't melt.) Cool for 5 to 10 minutes before dishing up.
Title: Re: Food
Post by: Frenzie on 2017-02-28, 09:39:19
This mac 'n' cheese, adapted from the book "Real Food Has Curves" by Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough, is quicker and easier to make than the classic casserole. It is hearty comfort food that easily functions as a main dish for vegetarians.
If that's unhealthy then a lot more people should start eating unhealthy. Admittedly I'd probably just eat onions, garlic, mushrooms & broccoli, likely with less or at least different cheese.