Skip to main content

Topic: What's Going on in China? (Read 41742 times)

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
What's Going on in China?
What is happening in China, the mainland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao, and with Chinese overseas?

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #300
Train table


  • rjhowie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #301
And that point is?

just as well I am a train fan.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #302
Train table
Any idea how the cost of a sleeper compares to the cost of flying?

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #303
The prices are very similar. Air fare is a bit more variable, cheaper or more expensive, but on average they come out the same (The slow train sleepers are cheaper, but not that much cheaper).

The table impressed me for two reasons. It is a little trite to say that the high-speed rail network in China has grown fast, though obviously it has, and the network is less than a decade old (the first line, Beijing-Tianjin opened August 2008, a week before the Summer Olympics). I was impressed by the extent this network has been established, and the at-a-glance quality of the table.

The 33 cities are the province/division capitals of China (with Shenzhen as a stand-in for neighbouring Hong Kong, and Zhuhai for neighbouring Macau). I was impressed that each cell represents a direct link between the two cities (the fastest link), a total of of 1056 direct links, though some of these are still missing. Europe has an extensive passenger network as well, but with a corridor/hub-and-spoke approach. If e.g. you'd want to go from Amsterdam to Rome, you would change trains twice, in Paris and in Milan. 

Not all of these connections are high-speed, only the blue cells are. With the dark blue you would expect to travel at least part of the time at speeds of 300+ km/h, while light blue would be in the 200-250 km/h range. The greens would be regular trains, with the dark greens going at decent speed as long as you don't travel too far. 

The chart gives a snapshot at the state of train travel in China. It could improve a little, like grouping the capitals more geographically (e.g. north-east, east, south-east, south-west, west, north-west). As is, the densely populated regions tend to be on the left, the sparsely one on the right. I would also added a progress bar to denote distance. Probably an inverse one. The shortest journey is Beijing to Tianjin, taking all of 31 minutes. The longest is Nanning in the extreme south-east (nearby Hanoi, Vietnam) to Ürümqi in the extreme north-west (by the Taklamakan desert and the Heavenly Mountains), at 59 hours and 6 minutes.


  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #304
In China they do things quickly by upping the numbers of workers involved.

https://nos.nl/artikel/2213537-in-china-vervangen-ze-het-spoor-met-1500-man-tegelijk.html

(Coordinating that must be hard...)

  • ersi
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #305
(Coordinating that must be hard...)
Coordinating in China is easy: Just keep adding and replacing people until things begin working.

If the process takes too much time, intimidate some strategic individuals or (simpler) everyone. This works universally of course.

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #306
I suppose you mean the railway track might suffer this fate? :P

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pktM__i-8IQ

  • ersi
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #307
They try their best and this is what their best occasionally looks like.

  • ersi
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #308
Chrome files discovered in "first homegrown" Chinese web browser
Redcore, which was previously known as AllMobilize Inc., claimed its web browser was the only one to be fully made in China, and that it would break the United States' "monopoly" on software. It even mentioned the browser's "independent intellectual property rights."

However, Chinese users discovered some surprising files in the Redcore browser's installation directory, including 'Chrome.exe' and several image files of the Chrome logo. [...] The option to download the Redcore browser has since been removed from the company's website.
Kinda like that Russian eink school tablet that came with great promises but turned out to be completely unusable and not Russian technology at all (or maybe Russian technology in the sense that it's unusable) http://en.rusnano.com/press-centre/news/88213

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #309
Quote
including 'Chrome.exe' and several image files of the Chrome logo
You don't need any of that to smell a Chromium-type browser from a mile away, setting aside the ease of spotting a WebKit/Blink type engine. Browsers like K-Meleon and SeaMonkey are significantly more distinct from Firefox than Vivaldi is from Chrome.

I was able to find a screenshot here: https://www.jqknews.com/news/57362-Standing_on_the_shoulders_of_giants_giant_creative_founder_of_red_core_browser_founder_resume_fraud.html

From that page:
Quote
Blink is an engine developed by Google and Opera, and a part of Chromium.
Is it really? Are they just saying that because Opera is Chinese now? :right:

In my experience Intel has made more significant contributions for example.

Interestingly, if you look at the AUTHORS document, all of the Intel contributors are listed as individuals and Opera Software ASA as an organization.

Here's the full list of credited companies:
Quote
   BlackBerry Limited <*@blackberry.com>
    Code Aurora Forum <*@codeaurora.org>
    Comodo CA Limited
    Google Inc. <*@google.com>
    Igalia S.L. <*@igalia.com>
    NVIDIA Corporation <*@nvidia.com>
    Opera Software ASA <*@opera.com>
    The Chromium Authors <*@chromium.org>
    The MathWorks, Inc. <binod.pant@mathworks.com>
    Torchmobile Inc.
    Venture 3 Systems LLC <*@venture3systems.com>
    Yandex LLC <*@yandex-team.ru>
    ARM Holdings <*@arm.com>

I single out Intel because those Intel contributors somehow manage to fix and improve those things that matter the most to me. I'm sure Opera does important work in VR or something. :P
  • Last Edit: 2018-08-18, 06:40:46 by Frenzie

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #310
AFAIR/AFAIK the Opera team made fairly significant contributions, merging in Opera adaptions to Blink. When Google set up in Oslo Morten and Rune started for Google/Chrome. As I remember it Rune began just days before me in 2000, and Morten just days after. Rune on the CSS parser, I forgot Morten's first project. They became core to the rendering engine in time. In the early days that was Geir and Karl Anders.

1. Google is starting a new office in Oslo
2. Several core Opera veterans are quitting

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #311
Quote
or example, Blink/ Chromium's way of showing multicolumn layouts was written by Morten from our R&D Department
Ah, excellent! Just the kind of stuff I like to see from Opera. They should publicize it better, or maybe I should glance over their announcements less. :)

Then again, in 2015 I still read them with more scrutiny. I guess I just forgot and perhaps I've negatively colored my memory with present-day impressions?

In any event, contributions by people from Intel somehow stand out to me. Perhaps the slight oddity of seeing a name like Intel contributing so much to a browser engine has something to do with it, unconsciously making it stand out more, while Opera "of course" contributes.

  • ersi
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #312
You don't need any of that to smell a Chromium-type browser from a mile away, setting aside the ease of spotting a WebKit/Blink type engine. Browsers like K-Meleon and SeaMonkey are significantly more distinct from Firefox than Vivaldi is from Chrome.
Sure, Chromium-type browsers are easy to spot. However, when your idea is to call the product your own, as a minimum replace all graphics and rename the main exe. Vivaldi has come pretty far in distinguishing itself.

And, in a bad way, also FF has come very far in distinguishing itself. Seamonkey and Palemoon are still recognisable Mozilla products/forks/derivatives. FF is not.