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Topic: What's Going on in China? (Read 72010 times)

  • jax
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What's Going on in China?
What is happening in China, the mainland, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macao, and with Chinese overseas?

  • Banned Member
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #75
Ah! we had such a bubble in our local stadium. Not because of air, I suppose...

Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #76
  • Last Edit: 2014-04-02, 18:17:36 by Jimbro3738

  • tt92
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #77
Looks like L.A. when I lived there as a child.

  • Macallan
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #78

Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #79
There are times when sucking air is useful.

  • rjhowie
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #80
Bemusing as I have just returned home from buying a cordless vacuum for upstairs and no woman came with it.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #81
Sad, that!

  • Banned Member
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #82
There's lots of vacuum upstairs, but I'd strongly advise you against getting cordless.

Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #83
When NASA first started sending up astronauts, they quickly discovered that ballpoint pens would not work in zero gravity. To combat the problem, NASA scientists spent a decade and $12 billion to develop a pen that writes in zero gravity, upside down, underwater, on almost any surface including glass and at temperatures ranging from below freezing to 300 C.

The Russians used a pencil.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #84
Unfortunately those ugly facts are at it again, The Write Stuff, but an interesting piece of technology history anyway.


  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #85
China is going to kill us all.
A matter of attitude.

  • tt92
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #86

China is going to kill us all.

and eat us.

  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #87


China is going to kill us all.

and eat us.

Oh yes, but in thin slices while you are still alive. You don't need photos of them doing it, do you?
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #88
Police search landfill for HK$28 million painting 'after cleaners mistake it for rubbish'

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Cleaners at the city's Grand Hyatt hotel are suspected to have dumped a painting that had just sold for more than HK$28 million with rubbish that was then taken to a landfill.

The Chinese ink wash painting, Snowy Mountain, by Cui Ruzhuo went under the hammer for HK$28.75 million, the second highest price among 22 of the artist's works sold during a two-day sale in the five-star Wan Chai hotel.

A police source said officers scrutinising closed-circuit TV footage yesterday saw a security guard kick the packaged artwork over to a pile of rubbish.

Cleaners were then seen disposing of the rubbish, which is believed to have been taken to landfill in Tuen Mun.

The source said police had been to the landfill but could find no trace of the painting.

A police spokesman today said the case had been classified as "theft", adding that no arrests had been made.

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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #89
The cleaners actually made the dauberpainter honoured by putting his poo..work among THE FOUNDATION OF A LIVING SPACE FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS!:cheers:

  • rjhowie
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #90
Well now Belfrager if China is going to kill us all they will possibly be clever enough to get what owed from the US of A. Bang goes our protection......
"Quit you like men:be strong"

Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #91
Pollution in China, particularly the city of Linfen. And I thought Grand Rapids was bad.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #92
Btw, have you seen the Russian film "Mongol"?


Sure, it was quite enjoyable. Too bad a Mongol II is unlikely.


  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #93
Too bad a Mongol II is unlikely.

Why?
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #94
To quote IMDB trivia
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Originally, 'Mongol' was the first part of a projected trilogy. However after the difficulty making this film, director Sergey Bodrov decided not to make the sequels. Several months after shooting wrapped however, he changed his mind again and decided to conflate his scripts for parts 2 and 3 into one script, and just do the one sequel, entitled 'The Great Kahn'. It was originally scheduled to be released in late 2010, but the project was held back for several months. In Noevember 2010 however, it was announced that all work on the film had ceased, and was unlikely to resume.
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Director Sergey Bodrov and Production Designer Dashi Namdakov visited Mongolia's chief shaman in the capital city of Ulan Bator, so that they could ask permission to film a movie about Genghis Khan's life. The shaman told them that of all the people who have talked about making such a film, they were the only ones to ask his permission.
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Some locations were so remote that the crew had to build roads to access them.
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The film took 14 months to shoot, and had a crew of 400 people (300 Chinese and 100 Russians), and over 1500 extras. Because there were so many different nationalities working on the film (Germans, Mongols, Chinese, Japanese, Russians, Ukrainians, Kazakhstanis), a team of over 30 interpreters were on set at all times.
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The quotation used at the beginning of the film is a genuine Mongolian proverb: "Do not scorn a weak cub. He may become the brutal tiger."
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The film was financed with money from Germany, Russia, Kazakhstan and the United States.
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The film was shot primarily in Kazakhstan and China. In China, the primary location was Inner Mongolia, a Mongolian province within China's borders which has more Mongolians living in it than Mongolia itself.
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Prior to appearing in the film as Börte, actress Khulan Chuluun was studying to be a journalist, and had never acted before. Director Sergey Bodrov had sent casting director Gulshat Omarova to Mongolia to look for actresses for the role, but she was unable to find any. Disappointed with her failure, she went to the Chinese Embassy to renew her Visa so as to travel back to China. Whilst she was in the embassy, she saw Khulan by sheer accident, and approached her to ask about playing the role.
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Prior to filming the scenes of Temudgin (Tadanobu Asano) and Börte (Khulan Chuluun) together, director Sergey Bodrov kept the two actors apart, and never allowed them to meet, as he didn't want them to be too comfortable with one another, due to the fact that they are supposed to have separated for several years in the film.
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During the shooting of scenes involving a lot of extras, it was discovered that many of the extras were drinking alcohol between takes, which was causing problems amongst the mixed nationalities when shooting began. As such, the production purchased some footballs and the extras played soccer amongst themselves. However, after several weeks, they became bored with this, and soon returned to drinking, until second assistant director Zhao Meng had the idea to hire some female dancers and singers, and bring them onto location to perform for the extras.
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  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #95
In resume, everything film making should be about. Magnifique.
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #96
Less Chinese suicides



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IN THE 1990s China had one of the highest suicide rates in the world. Young rural women in particular were killing themselves at an alarming rate. In recent years, however, China's suicides have declined to among the lowest rates in the world.

In 2002 the Lancet, a British medical journal, said there were 23.2 suicides per 100,000 people annually from 1995 to 1999. This year a report by a group of researchers from the University of Hong Kong found that had declined to an average annual rate of 9.8 per 100,000 for the years 2009-11, a 58% drop.

Paul Yip, director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong and a co-author of the recent study, says no country has ever achieved such a rapid decline in suicides. And yet, experts say, China has done it without a significant improvement in mental-health services--and without any national publicity effort to lower suicides.

The most dramatic shift has been in the figures for rural women under 35. Their suicide rate appears to have dropped by as much as 90%. The Lancet study in 2002 estimated 37.8 per 100,000 of this age group committed suicide annually in 1995-99. The new study says this declined to just over three per 100,000 in 2011. Another study of suicides, covering 20 years in one province, Shandong, found a decline of 95% among rural women under 35, to 2.6 suicides per 100,000 in 2010--and a 68% drop in suicides among all rural women.




  • Frenzie
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #97
If China's suicide rate has dropped so much, surely a similar graph could be drawn for cities?

  • Sparta
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #98
AFAIK

suicidal thoughts usually related to mental illness .

i/e bipolar

so..

what kind of China government did about  that mental health issues ?



  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in China?
Reply #99
Suicide rates fluctuate a lot. Some of it due to the challenges of collecting statistics, particularly in areas where suicide is taboo. Suicide can easily be classified as accidents or even not be counted for. Different methodologies could easily account for discrepancies.

All that notwithstanding, this may be a real effect. There have been reports on very high suicide rates among rural women not only in China, but also India and Pakistan  (that I have heard of). There might indeed be cultures of suicide.