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Topic: The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections  (Read 6506 times)

  • jax
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The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections
For those of us that enjoy the American spectacle every leap year and the fulfilment and joy that comes with it. Who's in, who's out? Who'll win and who'll claim it's all rigged? Who'll have the best party and who the longest hangover?

  • ensbb3
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Re: The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections
Reply #75
The role of the president is very different from expected
Indeed, the role wasn't as critical upon its written conception as it became in practice, being directly influenced by the founding fathers sitting in the position. Several were irked by the pointlessness of it all. Without running too far into and IIRC; it wan't until Madison watched the White House burn that the office really started to shape up to be more recognizable for what it is today. 

In another thread I mentioned the Dems focusing on legislative seats, mostly the Senate. For my purpose that's to reel in some powers that have only been scratched at since Bush II. Trump is the perfect one to help that too.

  • ersi
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Re: The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections
Reply #76
The role of the president is very different from expected
Indeed, the role wasn't as critical upon its written conception as it became in practice...
The role was comparable to kings elsewhere, so surely they would have been aware how critical it is. They wanted a king of their own, only term-limited and elective. In fact, in medieval Europe many kings and princes were elective (by aristocrats and oligarchs) and sometimes also term-limited, such as in Poland, in the Balkan countries, in several German and Russian states. If the founding fathers were who they are cracked up to be, they knew about these historical precedents - and likely they knew, because they were emulating these precedents.

Compared to modern democracies, the president of the USA combines the roles of the president and the prime minister. This is quite critical.

  • Frenzie
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Re: The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections
Reply #77
See most specifically the historical office of stadtholder, directly referenced by some of the American Founding Fathers as a blueprint for the US President. Note that for the Dutch Republic the stadtholder was initially mostly an ersatz king born from a then perceived necessity. With limited power compared to some kings, of course, but that was well-precedented in the Low Countries and abroad. The fact that the Spanish king didn't agree with said historical precedents was the root of the problem.

  • ensbb3
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Re: The Awesomesauce of the American 2020 Presidential Elections
Reply #78
The role was comparable to kings elsewhere, so surely they would have been aware how critical it is.
Well yes and no. The position didn't exist under the first constitution ( The Articles of Confederation ). A lot of the "Republic" ideas from that carried over. The power was meant to be retained by a legislative body. Washington is credited with setting precedence but moreover he didn't push any boundaries. He wanted to be, or at least was, the Anti-King. Adams and Jefferson had different opinions. Adams being more of a realist and Jefferson was always too idealistic. If memory serves both resented the office which was there for little more than a mediator. Veto power was looked at much like the electoral college, as insurance. Madison found out how valuable the title "Commander and Chief" was. A commander of nothing and chief of congress' will[ingness to do nothing].  
  • Last Edit: 2019-07-14, 13:14:00 by ensbb3