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Topic: The comings and goings of the European Union (Read 25612 times)

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
The comings and goings of the European Union
This thread is about new members entering (e.g. Croatia) and old members leaving (e.g. Britain) the Union, as well as other moves and changes in the European collective collective.

  • ersi
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #150
EU's final Copyright Reform upholds disastrous upload filters

The final text of Article 11 -- which has been the other major bone of contention -- also ended up being pretty much what opponents had feared, limiting the ability for any service to show snippets with links.

[...]

Parliament says Article 11 will allow hyperlinks to news articles to be accompanied by "individual words or very short extracts" without payments to rightsholders.
This seems to be about how search results would look like in a search engine. What a stupid thing to regulate. Even more, I think it is a stupid feature of the internet that there have to be search engines that display the results of *web crawlers* rather than what is really live on the internet. Web crawlers prioritise specific websites, say news portals, that they monitor constantly, so you get fresh stuff from those high-priority websites via search engine, while the search engine neglects other stuff. This has always been so, it is bad enough as it is, and it only makes it worse when regulators limit sharing content that is hard to get to in the first place.

The new regulation prevents displaying too much in the search engine, unless the search engine provider wants to "remunerate creators" even when "creators" have made it available to web crawlers. Probably Google's "cached" feature for pdf files in the search results will be gone - or gone for Europeans only. Total idiots at EU Commission.

But if the regulation is about more than just search results, if it's about, say, forum posts, twittering, news aggregators, then the EU Commission pretty much suppresses *sharing.* If so, the only safe place remains IRC. And darkweb.

The thing they should have done is to teach "creators" to not publish their stuff, to not make it available to web crawlers or other eyes on the internet. Don't "creators" have their own private/protected platforms where to share their stuff securely until their stuff becomes ready for publication? I have it (e.g. typing on my computer offline before I publish), so why don't they have it?

The final text of the Copyright Reform will now have to be approved by the Legal Affairs Committee, then voted on by member state governments in the European Council -- but it'll likely be passed there.
Oh, still another vote to go...

  • ersi
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #151
The UK is scheduled to leave the EU at 11pm local time on March 29 2019.
Oh no, this is not going according to schedule :(

  • Barulheira
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Schedules?!
Reply #152
The UK is scheduled to leave the EU at 11pm local time on March 29 2019.
Oh no, this is not going according to schedule :(
Oh, no! They are becoming Brazilian!

  • ersi
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #153
Breakthrough: UK and EU reach post-Brexit trade agreement
Just a week before the deadline, Britain and the European Union struck a free-trade deal Thursday that should avert economic chaos on New Year's and bring a measure of certainty for businesses after years of Brexit turmoil.
A week before the deadline? It always worked thus far to postpone all deadlines. It would have worked yet again as many times more. The negotiations were supposed to be over and out years ago.

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said: "It was a long and winding road, but we have got a good deal to show for it."

"It is fair, it is a balanced deal, and it is the right and responsible thing to do for both sides," she said in Brussels.
What does the EU have to show for the deal? The EU members lost fishing rights. UK will not be slapped with trade tariffs as any normal third-party country is. EU has removed BVI, SKN, ATG, CYM, and BMU from the list of tax haven countries in 2020, obviously giving in to UK, because all those countries are the worst tax havens by all measures.

The EU has long feared that Britain would slash social, environmental and state aid rules after Brexit and gain a competitive advantage over the EU. Britain denies planning to institute weaker standards but said that having to follow EU regulations would undermine its sovereignty.
And how will this agreement prevent it? As soon as UK notices that some of their goods will be examined in customs and their citizens cannot retire to Spain and Portugal without any obstacles anymore, they will start whining about their sovereignty yet again as if no relevant agreement had ever been negotiated. The only sovereignty UK is happy with is when nobody else has any sovereignty.

EU gained nothing. UK gained the same special treatment as when they were in EU. Maybe UK gained even better, because UK will push for own sovereignty (i.e. the right to interfere in the affairs of the continent) and EU will simply give in as always.

Johnson, who staked his career and reputation on extracting the country from the EU, said Britain will always be a strong friend and partner to the bloc.

"Although we have left the EU, this country will remain, culturally, emotionally, historically, strategically, geologically attached to Europe," he said.

  • Belfrager
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #154
I mostly agree with your vision ersi, but bottom line to me is that the EU gained to get rid of the UK. The European project doesn't need traitors.

This deal is nothing, mainly about some minor fishing, nothing about finance or economics. A way to the UK government to make the British population believe they still have any negotiating power. They don't.

I have to salute the Scottish prime minister's words that they didn't vote nothing of this and this is the moment for Scotland to become an Independent European nation. Be welcome.
 
A matter of attitude.

  • Luxor
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  • Global Moderator
Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #155
Scottish prime minister's

She's just called the First Minister, not PM.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #156
The increased political incentive for Scotland leaving the United Kingdom for the European Union is offset by the even stronger economic disincentive of a border between Scotland and England. In Northern Ireland the incentives go in the same direction. It makes more sense for Northern Ireland politically and economically to join Ireland (and the EU), though some will benefit from the current dual UK/EU regime.

Now, if Boris Johnson could follow through on his proposal to build that bridge from Scotland to Ireland there would be no reason for Scotland not to secede.


  • Belfrager
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #157
She's just called the First Minister, not PM.
Gabh mo leisgeul
A matter of attitude.

  • Luxor
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  • Global Moderator
Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #158
 :up:
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

  • Belfrager
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Re: The comings and goings of the European Union
Reply #159
For the detractors of the EU, the centralised vaccine acquisition process by Brussels for 27 countries was a fantastic thing allowing smaller countries to have the same negotiating power as the bigger ones.
Was not for that and people from Malta or Portugal or Estonia or many other nations would be vaccinated maybe by 2025.

A rare (very rare) example of the benefits of a centralised model of government, the same way the international co-operation between scientists was also a rare example of globalisation benefits.

Well, to Caesar what belongs to Caesar....
A matter of attitude.