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Topic: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't (Read 2514 times)

  • Frenzie
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Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
World of Walls : The Structure, Roles and Effectiveness of Separation Barriers
http://www.oapen.org/search?identifier=641876

Example quote from conclusion:
Quote
It is argued in the previous paragraphs that the fences Ceuta and
Melilla will continue to influence negatively Morocco's relations with
Spain and the EU. Spain's policy to fence the two enclaves' borders
reflects contradictory pressures in the region. While the Mediterranean
sphere has witnessed an increasing number of cultural and economic
cooperation projects in the last two decades, new physical and virtual
walls are being built in the region to achieve "Fortress Europe".

The way I "read" books like these is to skim through intro and conclusion to see if there's a chapter I want to delve into deeper. I'd argue it's slightly better than reading the newspaper summary of a book.

Quote
The U.S.-Mexico border wall marks the fault line between two different
worlds. Regardless of how many billions of dollars will be spent on
the further fortification and militarization of the common border, illegal
cross-border activities will continue so long as there is a huge disparity
in economic prosperity, political stability and social security between
the two countries.
Regional integration and advanced partnerships may reduce the
attractiveness of emigration, but they cannot erase the American dream
from the mind of millions of Latin Americans who will continue to seek
new ways to reach the America El Dorado -- regularly or irregularly.

Quote
The common denominator of new immigration policies taken
by the host countries in the last two decades is the linking between
immigration policy and border-control management on one hand,
and between the immigration policy and security issues on the other
hand.

[...]

Security concerns remain a main determinant of the current border-
control policies which aim at preventing infiltration of members of
armed groups, irregular migration, goods smuggling, drug trafficking
and other clandestine cross-border activities. In some cases, border
fortification reflects the desire to impose unilaterally the de facto border.

[...]

One of the paradoxes of "globalization" is that an increasingly
interconnected and interdependent world is simultaneously marked by
intensified militarization and fortification of national borders. Today,
some regions -- whether in North America, the Mediterranean or some
Asian sub-regions -- are being pulled in two different directions: one
toward more complementarity and integration (e.g., NAFTA, Union for
Mediterranean, ASEAN, SAARC) and another toward the erection of
further tangible and intangible border barriers.

Despite relentless efforts by receiving countries to prevent
unauthorized border-crossing by immigrants, drug smugglers
and dissidents, these groups have not been deterred. Rather, they
have adapted to the strategies designed to impede their movement,
developing new ways and means to circumvent such barriers.

[...]

Though military walls may reach some short-term goals by
destabilizing the enemy, armed groups can adapt to the new situation
by developing missiles that can exceed the height of these barriers,
by digging tunnels or by penetrating the enemy lines using forged
documents as has been seen in Palestine and Kashmir.

One thing the conclusion and therefore perhaps the book overlooks in my view on walls is that they might improve security short-term, but long-term the psychological distance between the two groups of people will only increase. They won't just be neighbors anymore, but people from the Other side of the wall.

  • Belfrager
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #1
Kama Sutra
A matter of attitude.

  • Barulheira
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #2
The Koran

  • ersi
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #3
Doesn't this thread more properly belong to the Hobbies & Entertainment section?

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #4
It's not my hobby to not read things I'd like to read if life were decades longer.  :P

  • krake
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #5
Kama Sutra
Maybe a few decades earlier it would have been a beneficial reading for you but one that doubtlessly can be skipped for now. :D

  • Barulheira
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Kama Sutra
Reply #6
Reading drives the fantasy. :)

  • Belfrager
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #7
You're both right, Krake and Barulheira.  :lol:
A matter of attitude.

  • rjhowie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #8
And pray tell me Barulheira why you would like to read the Koran? I love history and occasionally nuy a book on aspects of that subject that interest me in particular.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • Barulheira
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #9
Good question.
I'd like to have an opinion on my own, instead of hearing from others, about such a relevant belief system nowadays.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #10
It has its moments but overall it's terrible. Much more so than the Bible, imo. I would probably advise not repeating what I did and reading an abridged version instead. Note that when I say abridged I don't mean something aimed at children, but something that lays out the stuff in a slightly more logical order than biggest to smallest and gets rid of all or at least most of the repetition. I hear An Abridged Koran by CSPI is good.

Quote
AN ABRIDGED KORAN recreates the historical order of the Koran of Mohammed's day. The first chapters start with Mohammed's first recitation and the last chapters are those he recited before he died. Mohammed's life gives the Koran clarity, meaning, and order. When the Koran and Mohammed's life are brought together, the Koran becomes a powerful epic story.

AN ABRIDGED KORAN is identical to A SIMPLE KORAN except it has all of the repetition removed. For instance, the story of Moses and the Pharaoh is told 39 times. In AN ABRIDGED KORAN the story is told only once. Read AN ABRIDGED KORAN. It will change the way you see the world.

Of course the story of Moses isn't told the exact same way 39 times. It's vaguely Rashomon-like in its variations and different emphases, so I'd say you can only truly safely cut two thirds of it. If you want to get the full experience (like me) you should just read it in a more chronological order instead. For example, see here.

Also not uninteresting: http://www.koran-at-a-glance.com/ (though the quality of the Dutch translation I've read was, at least as far as the target language goes, significantly better than some weird King James Bible sound-alike)

  • Barulheira
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #11
Thank you, very much. As already said, I would like to read it but (probably) won't.

I have studied the Bible in many schools, in many translations, in several languages. I have got a broad comprehension of the mainstream Protestant Christianity. After all, only after learning how the current translations relate to the original languages' text could I see clearly how much of the doctrine was influenced by (or has influenced) the way how the text was (wrongly) translated.

Probably, I would have to follow a similar path to understand the Koran and Islam.

  • krake
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #12
how much of the doctrine was influenced by (or has influenced) the way how the text was (wrongly) translated.
If one replaces "doctrine" with history (influenced by bias) and "translated" with written then there is a certain similarity to history books. ;)

  • rjhowie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #13
Well I think if a person has an interest re books on a special interest it SHOULD be followed up. In some people that direction can show on occasions a touch of stress, etc that can put them off. I have always had a great interest in history and re one country have followed that up by particularly good books.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • ersi
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #14
The way I "read" books like these is to skim through intro and conclusion to see if there's a chapter I want to delve into deeper. I'd argue it's slightly better than reading the newspaper summary of a book.
It's definitely better to both read a few reviews and skim the book itself. Provided that the book is available for skimming of course.

[Koran] has its moments but overall it's terrible. Much more so than the Bible, imo.
The upside is that Koran is  shorter than NT, i.e. just a fraction of the size of the Bible. If one is able to read half the Bible, Koran will be a piece of cake. And the easy way to "make sense" of the chapter arrangement in Koran is to regard the chapters as if distinct books, like Bible consists of distinct books.

  • Belfrager
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #15
I would like to read the classical Greek master pieces but I probably will never do it... shame on you Belfrager.
A matter of attitude.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #16
shame on you Belfrager
:lol:

You haven't read at least a few? Or do you mean in the original Ancient Greek?

  • Belfrager
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #17
Only some light version of Ulysse's Odyssey when the lady does a tapestry by day and unmake it by night... if I'm not confusing everything.
A matter of attitude.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #18
Yes, Penelope did something like that. I found her character (or lack thereof) and the double standard disappointing. Odysseus is sleeping around with every goddess and sorceress who's vaguely attractive and meanwhile she's expected to remain celibate. I much prefer the likes of Dido, even if Vergil is a bit... heavy-handed. Oh well, such is the Golden Age of Roman Literature. I prefer the later Silver Age, I suppose.

  • ensbb3
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #19
I'd like to [but probably won't] go back and read some of the early American authors. Emerson, Thoreau - even Twain - and the others I'm not thinking of right now. Stories I read back when and without appreciation for them. Ones where have the gist of the derived meanings, tho, have long since lost the nuances of the stories.
That desire isn't really limited to American authors, but one post at a time. :)

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #20
Apparently there's such a thing as poisonous books. I'd like to take a look at it, but I probably won't... (and not just because of the geographical distance to Michigan).

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/shadows-from-the-walls-of-death-book

Quote
Shadows from the Walls of Death, printed in 1874 and measuring about 22 by 30 inches, is a noteworthy book for two reasons: its rarity, and the fact that, if you touch it, it might kill you. It contains just under a hundred wallpaper samples, each of which is saturated with potentially dangerous levels of arsenic.

The book is the work of Dr. Robert M. Kedzie, a Union surgeon during the American Civil War and later professor of chemistry at Michigan State Agricultural college (now MSU). When he came to serve on the state's Board of Health in the 1870s, he set out to raise awareness about the dangers of arsenic-pigmented wallpaper. Though a lethal toxin, arsenic can be mixed with copper and made into beautiful paints and pigments, most commonly Scheele's Green or Paris Green. This was no fringe phenomenon: near the end of the 19th century, the American Medical Association estimated that as much as 65 percent of all wallpaper in the United States contained arsenic.

It's been digitized:
https://collections.nlm.nih.gov/bookviewer?PID=nlm:nlmuid-0234555-bk

  • ersi
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #21
Apparently there's such a thing as poisonous books.
Of course. For example, in Umberto Eco's Name of the Rose, Aristotle's Poetics Book II was poisoned.

Umberto Eco is lightyears ahead of Dan Brown. Based on reviews, both write ancient-themed thrillers, so they can be legitimately compared. I'd like to read Umberto Eco, but probably won't. And I've done a pretty good job staying away from Dan Brown.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #22
Of course. For example, in Umberto Eco's Name of the Rose, Aristotle's Poetics Book II was poisoned.
I fail to see why something fictional means "of course." :)

  • ersi
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #23
It means that when you are familiar with the Name of the Rose, a poisonous book is old news.

  • Barulheira
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Re: Books I would like to read but (probably) won't
Reply #24
 :left:  :right:  :eyes: