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  • Beer?
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Total Members Voted: 2

Topic: Infrastructure (Read 49694 times)

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Infrastructure
Do we invest too little in public infrastructure, or too much? Should we spend more on new infrastructure, or in maintaining what we got? Should old infrastructure be replaced, upgraded, removed, or saved for posterity? Who should pay for it? Who should use it? What infrastructure should we have more of and what less? Is it good for your town, country, world, even if it is away from you? Where can we find good infrastructure and where bad?

  • Frenzie
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  • Administrator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #150
But what does central African atrocity at the hands of Europeans in the late 1800s have to do with the Wiki sentence you'd like to quote, other than to fuel anti-American sentiment?
Um, what are you on about? You said it's a European euphemism. I think you're slightly confused about what a euphemism is, considering that we (as in people who use language, not as in Europeans) don't say things like Holocaust or crimes against humanity to hide anything. A euphemism would be to say that Heydrich gave people special treatment. Anyway, I ignored that because I thought it was rather amusing that the originator of the phrase appears to be an American. Your counter-argument is to say that no, actually another American came up with it first?

Setting aside the question of whether I would fuel anti-American sentiment (I mean, why would I do that exactly? unlike some people *cough*krake*cough* I quite like America), how would anything relating to the Congo Free State fuel anti-American sentiment anyway?

Think about the things that have been done, in the name of Humanity! Surely you'll relent... Your position is untenable.
Which position is that? I've said that:

  • Whether or not an act is a crime against a construct doesn't affect the perpetrator's membership of that construct unless it's part said construct's definition (e.g., a criminal is not a law abiding citizen). Or more concretely, whether an act is a crime against nature is a separate question from whether that which commits the act is a part of nature.
  • Man is part of nature.
  • The phrase crime against humanity was effectively coined in 1890 by an American.

I did not say that sticking a label on a problem will somehow magically solve it.

  • rjhowie
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #151
And a special note on Reinhard Heydrich?
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • Frenzie
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  • Administrator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #152
Right, and Heydrich is part of humanity. I did say that. :P

  • ersi
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #153
...how would anything relating to the Congo Free State fuel anti-American sentiment anyway?
Don't you see? The whole world is in American interest, so at any given time anything negative implied about anything means implying something negative about America - when it serves a purpose for the time being. Trump is the president now and Putin has said nice things about Trump, so if you say anything negative about Putin, you are being anti-American. See, it all fits! Trump is coming to get you and he will make America great again.

I have already noticed that both Putin and Trump have adopted Obama's phrase: There are people who wish us harm...

  • krake
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #154
Setting aside the question of whether I would fuel anti-American sentiment (I mean, why would I do that exactly? unlike some people *cough*krake*cough* I quite like America), ...
No need for pushing me forward as justification for your own statements. :left:
In case you don't agree with some of my statements you are entitled to reply directly.
You know that when you point a finger at someone, there are three more pointing back at you.

  • Frenzie
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  • Administrator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #155
I'm not quite sure what that would justify or how. Nevertheless, mentioning you by (nick)name was a faux pas and I apologize for that. I didn't mean to imply that you would post something solely to fuel anti-American sentiment.
  • Last Edit: 2016-12-05, 14:09:07 by Frenzie

  • krake
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #156

  • Belfrager
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #157
I didn't mean to imply that you would post something solely to fuel anti-American sentiment.
But I'll do it very happilly in case you don't have the courage for doing it, :)
The same way, sometimes, I like to fuel anti European sentiment. :)
A matter of attitude.

  • rjhowie
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #158
Centuries ago Belfrager your corner was fuelling "heretic" fires. :D  Well frenzie the only thing about Heydrich was that he was intelligent and had he not been sacked from the navy well history might have been different for him!

The world is waiting to see what transpires after America's new and most un-political one at that.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • ersi
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #159
Centuries ago Belfrager your corner was fuelling "heretic" fires. :D 
Many countries have their own Wikipedia page like this one https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witch_trials_in_early_modern_Scotland

  • OakdaleFTL
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #160
Oddly enough, people remain ignorant to this day... Here, there and everywhere.

Isn't that the "infrastructure" that won't erode...? That can't be replaced?
进行 ...
"Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility." - James Thurber
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts!" - Richard Feynman
 (iBook G4 - Panther | Mac mini i5 - El Capitan)

  • rjhowie
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #161
And may you also add ersi the following.

There were witches who suffered in the good ole US of A. Plus blacks were done in, hung, burned out for being inferior.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • Belfrager
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #162
Centuries ago Belfrager your corner was fuelling "heretic" fires
I know the Holly Office records and files. You know nothing rjhowie.

So I let you talk as a parrot, a protestant parrot. Specialized on witch burning and not only.
Protestant Inquisition, the decay of European civilization. Burning in the name of money.
A matter of attitude.

  • krake
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #163
Burning in the name of money.
Not much has changed since, except that we have Napalm now. :)

  • ensbb3
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #164
I know the Holly Office records and files.
Oh good, there's an office for that. I was needing ideas for my holiday reef. I hate it when there's just a cluster-fuck of red berries. A record/files of proper ornaments and dispersion methods should come in handy... 

  • rjhowie
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #165
Hhm, Belfrager.......just shows how limited awareness is in Papist Portugal. Maybe I should remind of the following dear man.

Portugal a dictatorship for decades and so too was Spain. Add on the hard truth that Nazi Germany was heavily weighted on RC leaders and so to was Mussolini's Italy. Heavens even the Vatican did a dance with Benito back in the early years. So three out of three for your corner making a mark and just a pity the kind of mark!  :cheers:
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #166

  • Belfrager
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #167
It seems that we stopped them, it finishes in Madrid. No acess to the Atlantic Ocean.
Maybe we should send the bill to our American friends. :)
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #168
Hamburg and Rotterdam are the European ports. The disruptive change is in the South-East. The port of Piraeus (Athens) is upgraded, as is the railway line Athens-Budapest, and from there the European trunk route, including the Belgrade-Budapest section currently under construction. Assuming a rail upgrade Belgrade-Sofia-Istanbul (by the EU, China or both) the Balkans in the South-East of Europe will have their rail backbone much like the North-West and South-West. 

Looked askew there is a slight historical irony to this. The Port of Piraeus is right next to Salamis, the history-changing battle where the Athenians broke the Persian fleet and thus their full-scale invasion and will be hooked on by rail to the trunk route through Istanbul and Anatolia (Turkey) to the traditional arch-enemy Persia (Iran). Of course Persepolis is long gone, burned down by Macedonian pyromaniacs, but this Chinese-initiated project would join some of the oldest enemies in history. (More challenging this project would also join some much fresher enemies, the biggest headache would be between Iran and China, the Central Asian Republics, the -stans, where Russia wouldn't be a disinterested party.)

The sea road ends in Venice, a relative rail shortcut to Piraeus, the Gotthard Base Tunnel, which opened a couple days ago, and all. Shorter rail route means longer ship route, so there wouldn't be a time benefit, but in both cases the huge detour around the Iberian Peninsula can be avoided, and it is a whole lot cheaper than digging a Suez Canal through France.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #169
The Atlantic is also reachable from West Africa, as well as the Northeast Passage.

The American-Chinese favourite Djibouti will remain a strategic port for the Americans, the Chinese and the landlocked parts of the Horn of Africa. Mombasa/Kenya will have a similar role for East Africa.



Background: Chinese-built railways in Africa

All aboard! The Chinese-funded railways linking East Africa

  • Last Edit: 2016-12-15, 08:15:04 by jax

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #170
Strategically the three corridors Kashgar-Gwadar, Kunming-Singapore, and Kunming-Mandalay-Dhaka-Kolkata are the important ones.

Kashgar-Gwadar is why China and Pakistan are best friends forever. This route bypasses the Malacca Strait and a tortuous sea route from the East China Sea. The Strait and that tortuous sea route is what made Singapore, on the other hand Singapore's position is not getting less strategic with the growth of South-East Asia.

The Kunming-Mandalay-Dhaka-Kolkata corridor joins China, Burma, Bangladesh and India, and conveniently offers another alternative to the Malacca Straits from Dhaka/Chittagong

  • Belfrager
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Re: Infrastructure
Reply #171
Strategically the three corridors Kashgar-Gwadar, Kunming-Singapore, and Kunming-Mandalay-Dhaka-Kolkata are the important ones.
Who would say it... I thought the Reno was an important corridor for the Germans and others like them. Poor Europe, no more corridors anymore.
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #172
Reno?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Xyp63MaSBs

There are plenty of European corridors to walk the line. Gotthard Base Tunnel has been mentioned a few times.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QAoQMvRVJPI

Here in Stockholm there's a new coridor opening opening in seven months that will be important for Sweden, though not the rest of Europe.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C78TmvrftHA

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #173

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: Infrastructure
Reply #174
This video is alright (not great, just alright):
Speaking of these Wendover videos, another one covers a crucial air transport paradigm shift, from hub-and-spoke to  point-to-point transport.

https://youtu.be/NlIdzF1_b5M

Fuel-efficient long-range planes like B787 or the A350 are taking over the world, reducing the need for global airport hubs (not that Dubai, Beijing and the others seem to care).