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Topic: Palaeogeology and History of The Solar System (Read 950 times)

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Palaeogeology and History of The Solar System
Well... No Creationism, if you don't mind.
In the Beginning, there was a Big Bang - or whatever.
Blah-blah-blah, blah-blah-blah, one shiny morning a star emerged in one of the prongs of the galaxy that not even then conceived humans would much-much later call the Milky Way.
And here our Story begins...

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Re: Palaeogeology and History of The Solar System
Reply #1
Here's the first part of a well updated "history of Earth", if you don't mind: .
Geologists and such guys measure the timescale of the Earth's and even Universe's history in some standard units - based on years, years as we have them now. Then come - days? Yeah, there are "standard days", but we remember that the length of a day has always been changing - since the beginning of Earth's rotation -- right? Now what about a year?
Was the early Earth's orbit stable in yonder days? Interesting, huh?:)

  • Frenzie
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Re: Palaeogeology and History of The Solar System
Reply #2
Something to note there is that in plenty of sci-fi, people look for this planet where a day actually lasts one Earth Day, and that has a satellite. Setting aside apocalyptic scenarios, in a few million years an Earth day will have slowed to e.g. 25 hours, and will thus no longer correspond to the universal standard.

  • rjhowie
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Re: Palaeogeology and History of The Solar System
Reply #3
Being an unrealised centre of the Universe won't effect Glasgow.
"Quit you like men:be strong"