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Topic: What's Going on in Antiquity? (Read 290 times)

  • Belfrager
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What's Going on in Antiquity?
News from the ancient worlds.
A matter of attitude.

  • Belfrager
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A roman snack-bar was discovered
Reply #1


Archaeologists uncover ancient street food shop in Pompeii
You can know what people were eating at the disaster day... (a bit of a morbid thing to know)
A matter of attitude.

  • OakdaleFTL
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #2
Elections? :)
进行 ...
"Humor is emotional chaos remembered in tranquility." - James Thurber
No one listens to me as much as I do and even I have my limits...
"Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts!" - Richard Feynman

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #3
This has been a good tomb-looting year, or as Esquire puts it: We Sure Are Digging Up a Lot of Ancient Dead People These Days

The Norwegian and Spanish ones are late and thus out of period (Viking and Muslim age respectively), but the Egyptian one is right in time, full of Greeks hidden in boxes. 

Still, Esquire missed the biggest one, in Chengdu.

https://youtu.be/jEEUWjvXWI4



  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #4

  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #5
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #6
Hey! That's the old kingdom. That predated antiquity with 2-2½ millennia, longer than the 1½ millennia antiquity predated us. But we might be here because those Egyptians liked a tipple. So  :cheers:

I have made a proposal to keep track of time, when a wrist watch won't do: Big history: Generational history

  • Belfrager
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #7
Why did you start counting at around 3.000BC? the real scale in my opinion would be around 40.000 years ago, with Homo Sapiens.
Course in that case you would have 40000/30=1333 generations where nothing happens during 1200 generations. A bit boring story.
A matter of attitude.

  • Frenzie
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #8
Some 5 000 years ago, when people moved they packed their suitcases and their monoliths.
The discovery of a dismantled stone circle--close to Stonehenge's bluestone quarries in west Wales--raises the possibility that a 900-year-old legend about Stonehenge being built from an earlier stone circle contains a grain of truth. Radiocarbon and OSL dating of Waun Mawn indicate construction c. 3000 BC, shortly before the initial construction of Stonehenge. The identical diameters of Waun Mawn and the enclosing ditch of Stonehenge, and their orientations on the midsummer solstice sunrise, suggest that at least part of the Waun Mawn circle was brought from west Wales to Salisbury Plain. This interpretation complements recent isotope work that supports a hypothesis of migration of both people and animals from Wales to Stonehenge.

  • jax
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Re: What's Going on in Antiquity?
Reply #9
Why did you start counting at around 3.000BC? the real scale in my opinion would be around 40.000 years ago, with Homo Sapiens.
Course in that case you would have 40000/30=1333 generations where nothing happens during 1200 generations. A bit boring story.

For that, blame the Egyptians. A pretty natural starting point is the bronze age. The need for copper and tin led to a Eurasian trading network all the way from Japan to Scandinavia. That would also coincide with the diffusion of writing, technology, farming surpluses, cities, organised warfare and so on. So 3500-4000 years ago, 120-130 generations ago would be a happening time to begin our period. If we set the Younger Dryas as a convenient starting point for agriculture, we could split that into three parts of about 4000 years, the first third would mostly have been lost in the fog of prehistory, but by the end we'd have fairly functional agriculture with the first animal-driven ploughs, modern pottery and so on. The second third wouldn't be so dramatic either but at least we'd get some stories, and the first individuals we know the name of. And of course, byt the third everything was buzzing, and there are little differences with the world today.

That third could be trisected as well, roughly before antiquity, during antiquity, and now (after antiquity).

But by bisecting as I did (arbitrarily with the first king of united Egypt), this counting would start closer to the beginning, and we have 170 generations to work with, rather than 120.