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Topic: What is your weather now? (Read 125364 times)

  • Luxor
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What is your weather now?
What is your weather now?


9°C Breezy and raining.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #100
Cold and windy. Wish I could stay curled up and warm.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #101
-16'C, sunny.

  • Luxor
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #102
4°C Cloudy, grey, wet and windy.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #103

  • Luxor
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #104
Heavy rain, cold and windy.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #106

  • Luxor
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #107
Very windy, heavy rain, then snow, then rain and then more snow.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

  • Luxor
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #108
Cold, cloudy with rain and snow flurries.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #109
T'was sunny here again! Maybe someone could gonna envy this one;)

  • jax
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #110
Middle Sweden. In theory it has stopped snowing after 3-4 days of snowy weather that the English and probably the Scottish would call a blizzard. The view from my window disagrees.

Norway, especially more Northern parts have been unusually warm and dry this winter, which has led to an unusual hazard for mid-winter Norway: wildfires.

Norway fire ravages historic wood village in Laerdal was just the first village to go, there were three the following week.

Then, in China Shangri-La had burned down the week before, a fiery end to the year.
  • Last Edit: 2014-01-31, 09:10:19 by jax

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #111
According to the Dutch definition, a snowstorm is a a combination of snowfall and at least 8 Beaufort.* A blizzard is not a thing--at least not in the Netherlands--because that's a specific North-American type of snowstorm caused by the polar air from the northern plains. But I suppose that if a Dutch snowstorm occurs when it's colder than -6°C at speeds of at least 7 Bft for at least 3 hours, and visibility is sufficiently impaired, you might reasonably call it a blizzard. However, the heaviest Dutch snowstorm of the 20th century fails to meet the first criterion. It was -5°C.

The 20th century had 22 snowstorms; the 21st century hasn't had any yet.

* However, a storm is defined as at least 9 Beaufort.

  • jax
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #112
That is pretty much the Norwegian definition as well, which after all follows from the word "snøstorm" (or more Germanic "snestorm"), a storm with snow in it. So does the Wikipedia definition.
Quote
A blizzard is a severe snowstorm caused by strong sustained winds of at least 56 km/h (35 mph) and lasting for a prolonged period of time - typically three hours or more.


This was how I used the world "blizzard", but later I realised that English have a tendency to call any form of heavy (or even not that heavy) snowfall with the barest minimum of wind.

  • Luxor
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #113
Cold, windy, rain and snow.
The start and end to every story is the same. But what comes in between you have yourself to blame.

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #114
The word storm is definitely used a lot wider in English than in Dutch. To me the idea of calling something less than 7 Bft a storm is preposterous, and even 7 Bft is more a bit breezy than stormy (I grew up at the coast). But in English, a bit of snow or rain, or just a bit of thunder can be a "storm" with barely any wind at all. However, I think Americans might be a bit less loose-lipped with the word than the British.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #115
The word storm is definitely used a lot wider in English than in Dutch.
No wonder!
Northern nations have developed much larger spectrum of "snow" lexicon - due to, apparently, their relevant allocation/habitat. For example, while Russian has a handful of terms for snowy weather, I've heard that some Far North aborigenes' languages have tens or more both for the snow falling - AND snow LYING! :)

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #116
And the sun shone today again here! :P ;D

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #117
No wonder!
Northern nations have developed much larger spectrum of "snow" lexicon - due to, apparently, their relevant allocation/habitat.

The Eskimo thing is a myth. Anyway, I think you've misunderstood what I was saying. In Dutch, the word storm means very strong winds. In English, it also has the broader connotation of any kind of unpleasant weather.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #118
the broader connotation
⬆Sic!(not exactly "connotations" is the word, though...) What I meant
By the way, would you mind citing some "snow" words from your language? Against "English storms" (and blizzards) Russian has some "пурга", "вьюга", "метель", "позёмка" ("пурга" originates from some norther regions, I reckon)...

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #119
Wikipedia has a couple for your amusement: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sneeuw#Sneeuwval

We have tons of snow words. Sneeuwjacht is snow that's being "hunted" by strong gales, but that is not the same thing as a sneeuwstorm, which I already defined. Sneeuwduinen are snow dunes. There's paksneeuw (snow closely packed together), plaksneeuw (sticky snow), stuifsneeuw (dust snow), papsneeuw (porridge snow), poedersneeuw (powder snow), driftsneeuw (drifting snow), jachtsneeuw (see above, except here it's the snow rather than the process), dwarrelsneeuw (twirling snow), korrelsneeuw (crumble snow), motsneeuw (wet crumbles), krotsneeuw (in between hail and snow), and I could go on but probably not without some memory aids.

How far north is west, anyway? :right: But I know that further north or south isn't everything. England's climate is roughly the same, and grosso modo actually slightly warmer than here because it is under a stronger influence of the Gulf Stream.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #120
Sneeuwjacht is snow
GUESS! Snow on the yacht?:)
England's climate is roughly the same...
Same as WHAT!?
Are you kidding? Rather Scotland - ask you know whom...

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #121
Scotland has nothing on Canada and the northern US.

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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #122
Because the Isles have The Current.

  • jax
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #123
Wikipedia has a couple for your amusement: http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sneeuw#Sneeuwval

Wikipedia also has for Norwegian and English.

The lists are pretty much similar.  Nysnø, new snow, is freshly fallen snow. Kram snø, wet snow, snow wet enough to make snowballs, kram and wet being adjectives, but kram is an archaic word only used for snow. Slaps and slush is the same thing, pretty onomatopoeic. Skare is snow crust, but possibly used more in Norwegian because it is a specialised word.

There are only a few words that are in Norwegian, but not in English. One of these is svulle, plural svuller, most often preceded with ice to get issvuller. The word, a cognate to the English verb swell, is the weather phenomena I complained about a page or so ago. It refers to those lumps of ice on the ground that makes you slip, fall, and break your neck, or at least perform some awkward acrobatics in the process of doing so. Ice swellings is a missing word in English.

  • Frenzie
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Re: What is your weather now?
Reply #124
Let's see, what kind of things do you have. In case of nachtvorst (night/ground frost), that might lead to the opvriezen (freezing up) of e.g. porridge snow or just plain water. If the ground is freezing, but the air isn't, and it rains, that forms ijzel (ijs  = ice; ijzel = the rain-caused form of black ice). There are a couple of other factors, but collectively it's known as gladheid (slipperiness). But the best I can think of right now is something like ijs onder sneeuw. I can't for the life of me remember what I used to call this phenomenon when it used to occur frequently. (Again, the 21st century has been rather warm.)

The weather right now is 7° C and raining.