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Topic: "Scientists Say" blather (Read 58833 times)

"Scientists Say" blather
Are you, too, bothered by internet news reports that "scientists say" this or that. I find it utterly annoying. Who are these scientists? Are cosmologists qualified to say anything meaningful about high energy physics, biologists about the orbit of Enceladus?

What think you?

  • ersi
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #300
Scientists say this is a photo of a black hole.



The image reveals the black hole at the centre of Messier 87 [1], a massive galaxy in the nearby Virgo galaxy cluster. This black hole resides 55 million light-years from Earth and has a mass 6.5 billion times that of the Sun [2].

  • Barulheira
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Holes
Reply #301
Strictly speaking, by definition, no hole can be photographed; just the stuff around it can. :sherlock:

  • Frenzie
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #302
But -- strictly speaking -- a black hole is more of a dark star than a hole, isn't it? ;)

  • Barulheira
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No holes
Reply #303
Yes. Strictly speaking, a black hole is black but is not a hole.  :rolleyes:

  • ersi
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #304
Scientists Identify New Snail Species, Name It after Greta Thunberg

Probably because scientists have found no better way to get into the news lately.



  • rjhowie
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #305
Maybe space fanatics and would be explorer will fall into the hole and sense be the routine.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • ersi
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #306
Scientists are struggling with MS Excel. Can you tell who is winning?

If you enter "SEPT1" in Excel, it will immediately change the cell to read "1-Sept" because it thinks you're trying to enter a date. To make matters worse, there is no way to disable this automatic reformatting. You have to change the cell formatting in each spreadsheet manually. Failing to do so can lead to corrupted data and wasted time. Not everyone is an expert in Excel, so mistakes were common. (Note: Hitting ' in front of a data field in Excel will tell the cell to format as text, but there is no way to set this as default).

The scientific body that controls gene naming has now stepped in to set things right. The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) has thus far renamed 27 genes to ensure Excel doesn't butcher their names. For example, the gene MARCH1 codes for a protein called Membrane Associated Ring-CH-Type Finger 1. HGNC has renamed that gene to MARCHF1 to avoid confusion. SEPT1 is now SEPTIN1. The HGNC will keep a record of the changes so there's no confusion in the future when researchers read materials with the old names.

  • jax
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  • Global Moderator
Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #307
The scientists. Fewer sources of error.

  • Frenzie
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #308
My favorite new feature in Office 2000, XP or '03 or thereabout was that you could immediately disable an autocorrect when it happened. The disadvantage is that you still need to notice it happening first. I've never understood the point of that stuff; it's one of the reasons I prefer plain text editors.

  • Belfrager
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #309
Probably because scientists have found no better way to get into the news lately.
It must be. The justification given by the "citizen scientist"(??) for naming the snail that way it's an anecdote.
It seems they did it before with another snail and actor Di Caprio's name.
Poor snails.
A matter of attitude.

  • Barulheira
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Re: "Scientists Say" blather
Reply #310
Back in the days of 1997 I disabled each and every auto-anything setting right after installing that kind of software. It's annoying when I tell the software to do one thing and it does another.