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Poll

I prefer...

  • ...generally films to books
    2 (28.6%)
  • ...generally books to films
    4 (57.1%)
  • ...generally beer and then we'll see whatever else you may've got there
    1 (14.3%)

Total Members Voted: 7

Topic: Films and Books (Read 12048 times)

  • ersi
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Films and Books
Sometimes they make both a book and a film out of the same story, such as all Michael Crichton or all Stephen King...

This thread is to share and discuss literature and cinematography as art forms and personal passion, not as mere entertainment. List your favourites and discuss :)


MY BOOKS TOP 5

Mika Waltari, Sinuhe
Milan Kundera, Immortality
W.S.Maugham, Of Human Bondage
Ghazali, Niche of Lights
Vidyaranya, Panchadasi


MY FILMS TOP 5

Miyazaki, Sen to Chihiro no kamikakushi
Chaplin, City Lights
Kromanov, Põrgupõhja uus vanapagan (1964)
Nair, Salaam Bombay
Petersen, Das Boot (1981 original, not the lengthened director's cut)


COMMENTS

In my list, the books Sinuhe and Of Human Bondage have made it to film. I have seen the films Sinuhe by Michael Curtiz, 1954, and the British Of Human Bondage from 1934. While re-written well into self-contained films, they are necessarily limited compared to the books. The novels are true epics and cannot be properly transferred to film (unless one is ready for lengthy soap-operatic TV series).

Among films in my list, I have heard that Das Boot was originally a novel, but I haven't read it. Põrgupõhja uus vanapagan is a novella by the most celebrated Estonian author Tammsaare, based on Estonian folk tales. The film version is by one of the very few Estonian directors who is worth to be called a director at all. Estonian cinematography in general never was worth watching, but Kromanov almost has a touch of Ingmar Bergman. Estonian writers are generally recommendable though.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #50
One of my weekend reads resulting from perusing the OAPEN Library was Temptation in the Archives. I liked it. A lot.

The fashionable thing to do these days would probably be to write a graphic novel based on the epistolary contacts of the Huygens family. Heck, I'd read it. But Lisa Jardine shows that just plain good writing is more than enough to keep you glued to the pages in this page-turner essay collection about archival science. Yes, you read that right, and no, there's no irony hidden between the lines. Download the open-access book right now (clickety-click) and read chapter 3: "Never Trust a Pirate: Christiaan Huygens's Longitude Clocks." You can thank me later.

[...]

  • ersi
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #51
Commuters who can read a book while walking to work are far better people than those who can't, Londonist can exclusively reveal.
I wonder if this also applies to texting while walking. And while driving.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #52
Heh.

Have you ever had to give up on a book because it was too difficult? Last year I mentioned that I wanted to read Pietr-le-Letton. I'd given up on it in 2015 because it was a touch too difficult. I should be able to read it much the same as a Dutch, English or German simple detective novel now.

That reminds me, I should get around to reading Pietr-le-Letton.

Probably the most challenging book I've since read is Memoirs d'Hadrien, and I'm currently reading La vie: mode d'emploi, which isn't exactly easy either. Last month I even read a French academic book on Herodus Atticus just for fun, but academic works are much easier than literature. Nevertheless I thought nothing in French was beyond my reach now. But I borrowed a nice 1912 copy of Là-bas (Down There) by Joris-Karl Huysmans and I had to give up on it after a twenty-some pages because its vocabulary was just beyond my ken. You just can't read if it feels like you have to look up 50 words every page. Perhaps I'll return to it someday.

  • Belfrager
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #53
You just can't read if it feels like you have to look up 50 words every page
It turns reading irritantly slow.
A bit like video,I don't have the patience for so much time watching something that could have been said in just a paragraph.
A matter of attitude.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #54
Agreed. I occasionally watch or listen to a documentary while washing the dishes (usually I prefer a more relaxing silence) but otherwise who has the time for video?

  • ersi
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #55
...page-turner essay collection about archival science.
Roughly in the same nerdy category, "Why Don't Mediaeval Logicians Ever Tell Us What They're Doing? Or, What Is This, A Conspiracy?" From Paul Vincent Spade's page.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #56
Thanks, that was interesting. Here's a counter-argument:

P. King (2004). "Opposing and responding: comments on Paul Spade." http://individual.utoronto.ca/pking/presentations/Spade_Comments.pdf

  • Belfrager
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #57
I'll read that with more time. For know, it seems to have the typical perfume of Northern ignorance.
A matter of attitude.

  • ersi
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #58
Yet another bookmark reminder for myself: knihi.com contains pretty much everything ever written in Belarussian.

  • RomFil
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #59
you watch "Who Am I - Kein System ist sicher" ? film on hacker for lulz (prototype of real hacker group "lulz security" ) 

  • ersi
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #60
The government of the republic of Estonia threw money at a host of culture project throughout the centennial celebrations (about a third year in a row now) and, in this broader context, the Tõde ja õigus movie got made. It is running now and a bunch of people have gone to see it and have praised it, even children. Very shockingly I caught flu this year, which has prevented me to go see it thus far, even though my definite plan was to see it asap.

Tõde ja õigus, translated into English as Truth and Justice, was originally a series of novels, written and published by the Estonian writer Anton Hansen Tammsaare starting in mid-1920's. Now, Tammsaare is the archetypal writer for Estonians and Tõde ja õigus is his most monumental work. The first volume is compulsory for every kid in school. In my opinion, it is forced on kids too early so they cannot appreciate. I personally near-hated the book, as did everyone else I knew back then.

So it is surprising to see that the modern generation of children like this movie version now. Must be a good movie. I must stop writing and go see it now this weekend because my flu has pretty much subsided.

  • RomFil
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #61
best road movie (eurotrip) and
relationship
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIP9PJx9S98

  • ersi
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Re: Films and Books
Reply #62
So I saw the Tõde ja õigus movie. As a minimum, it represents the novel well, but I think it works independently too, particularly for foreigners. It is a strong epic drama by itself. A Singaporean said after seeing it that it's very Shakespearean. I gues it is a compliment. Yay, Estonian Gone With The Wind has been born, finally.

The comparison is not too good. Most people take Gone With The Wind to be a romantic story, whereas I take it to be an epic panorama of an era. The Tõde ja õigus series (of novels - a pentalogy - the movie covers just the first part) is very much an epic panorama of eras over generations. And the movie does lots of good truth and justice to it, which is a pretty impressive achievement by itself. I thought I would find something to quibble over some things that got left out, but they had made all the right choices and the almost three-hour monster of a movie (longest Estonian movie ever) stays quite concise and focused, something that Estonian movies do not usually do. Applauds.