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Topic: Grammatical Mutterings (Read 36365 times)

Grammatical Mutterings
It's simply a neuter indeterminate pronoun. A construction like "The girl went shopping. It came home with a new hat."*  is quite ordinary. "She came home..." would be ungrammatical in this context.
You are most probably right, and I must be fairly outdated in German grammar. I didn't know about such usages of "es". For me, "Es regnet" was the most representative usage of it. Thanks, anyway.
  • Last Edit: 2013-12-29, 16:02:01 by Frenzie

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #75
Repent.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #76
"Repent" who?

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #77
What do you mean, "who"? One would repent an action, not a person.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #78
What do you mean, "who"?
You said "Repent.".
WHO should do?:)

  • tt92
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #79

Repent.

I don't have to.
I pented once and got it right the first time,

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #80
I pented once and got it right the first time,

:up:

  • Belfrager
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #81


Repent.

I don't have to.
I pented once and got it right the first time,

The man that only grets once. He never regrets.
Way to go, Australian.
A matter of attitude.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #82
The man that only grets once. He never regrets.
Repeat, please.
:rolleyes:

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #83
Belfrager only peats. Get with the program. ;)

Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #84
The internet is loaded with misspellings and other gaffes. How about a radar that can spot angels at a certain hight?
Quote
The Wurzburg Radar: satellite dishes had a range of around 30 klm. And were extremely accurate for measuring angels for the hight of incoming aircraft.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #85

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #86
Hush, Josh. :lol:

  • tt92
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #87

The internet is loaded with misspellings and other gaffes. How about a radar that can spot angels at a certain hight?
Quote
The Wurzburg Radar: satellite dishes had a range of around 30 klm. And were extremely accurate for measuring angels for the hight of incoming aircraft.


Non Angeli sunt, sed angli.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #88
Now I get it! I suppose angels ARE measured in kilolumens.:P

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #89
https://thedndsanctuary.eu/index.php?topic=245.msg17540#msg17540
What does - in the second line - "head full of zombie" mean?

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #90
I don't speak Aussie, but I'm gonna go out on a limb and suggest it refers to Mary J.  :sherlock:

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #91
Well, "according" to their clip, it was "head" referring to the inners of their "fried-out combie", huh?;)

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #92
Not exactly grammatical, but then neither was the last page or two.

Shakespeare in the original pronunciation sounds a bit like a cross between a Scottish and an American accent (and not at all like RP). Of course, I've always read that American English is a lot closer to Shakespeare's English, but it's pretty cool to hear the reconstruction.


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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #93
So, they undug some ancient cassettes or what?:rolleyes:

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #94
We have a pretty good idea of what Middle Dutch and Middle English sounded like. But for some reason we never pay much attention to the pronunciation of Early Modern X, because the whole Modern aspect means it's close enough to today that we don't have to bother too much with the correct pronunciation.

I'd imagine something similar applies to Middle Russian?

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #95
Early Modern X
???

I'd imagine something similar applies to Middle Russian?
Yeah, we're muttering in the middle.
:D

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #96

Early Modern X
???

Early Modern Dutch, Early Modern English, Early Modern French, Early Modern High German, and so forth.

Re: Immigrants
Reply #97
Where the emigrant is from plays a big part.
"To play a part" means "to act in a role".
The term "emigrant" refers to those who, having left their motherland (often unwillingly/reluctantly), have not broken their (often spiritual) connection to the place they've come from. Usually the term is used referring to particular exodi: Russians from Soviet Russia, German citizens from Nazi Germany, etc. Often such people do not even haste to acquire the citizenship of the host country.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #98
"To play a part" has been metaphorically used meaning "to participate in something" for so long that it is a stretch to call its current usage metaphorical. This is not a usage that is incorrect, like how people misuse begging the question. The oldest quotation in the OED dates back to 1596: Raigne of Edward III sig. A4v, "Bearest thou a part in this conspiracy?"

  • jax
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #99

Shakespeare in the original pronunciation sounds a bit like a cross between a Scottish and an American accent (and not at all like RP). Of course, I've always read that American English is a lot closer to Shakespeare's English, but it's pretty cool to hear the reconstruction.


Kind of kool. So instead of  'aving a speak like a pirate day, we should have a speak like a Shakespearian?