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Topic: Grammatical Mutterings (Read 17771 times)

Grammatical Mutterings
It's simply a neuter indeterminate pronoun. A construction like "The girl went shopping. It came home with a new hat."*  is quite ordinary. "She came home..." would be ungrammatical in this context.
You are most probably right, and I must be fairly outdated in German grammar. I didn't know about such usages of "es". For me, "Es regnet" was the most representative usage of it. Thanks, anyway.
  • Last Edit: 2013-12-29, 16:02:01 by Frenzie

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #100
I'll make sure to carry my sword.



(Explanation for the uninitiated)

Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #101
Came across a word, "yesteryear".

  • jax
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #102
Just keep in mind that though the word was originally modelled upon yesterday, in modern English it doesn't usually mean "last year" (though it can, and this sense of the word may be growing more common), rather referring to the recent years.

Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #103
 I could see that from the context, thanks.:cool:

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #104
yesterday

The Dutch (gisteren/gister) and German (gestern) cognates are independent, without a day attached. There's also eergister(en), something like yore-yester: the day before yesterday.

You can say things like:
gistermorgen (yesterday morning)
gistermiddag (yesterday afternoon)
gisteravond (yesterday evening/night)

but not gisterdag or gisterjaar (except in poetry, one imagines).

  • jax
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #105
Norwegian and Czech are structurally similar to each other in having about the same concepts, but the words are each unique, there isn't much of a pattern

Norwegian / Czech / English

forgårs / předevčírem /day before yesterday
i går / včera / yesterday
i morgen / zítra / tomorrow
overimorgen / pozítří / day after tomorrow

forifjor / předloni / year before last year
i fjor / loni / last year

No particular phrase for next year (neste år, příští rok) or the year after.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #106
No particular phrase for next year (neste år, příští rok) or the year after.
Because they've thought they were doomed.:lol:
Looks like Slavic words are similar. In Russian we have "вчера" and "завтра" for "yesterday" and "tomorrow". The former seems to derive from "вечер" ("evening/night"), the latter - from "утро" ("morning"); looks like the English "tomorrow" originated a similar way.

  • tt92
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #107
Good morrow to you all, good sirs.

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #108
Good terday to you too.
... No terday????

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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #109
lose - /lu:z/ -- verb: not to win, or cease to have something
loose - /lu:s/ -- adjective: not tight, lax

  • jax
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #110
25 Words That Are Their Own Opposites

Quote
Here's an ambiguous sentence for you: "Because of the agency's oversight, the corporation's behavior was sanctioned." Does that mean, 'Because the agency oversaw the company's behavior, they imposed a penalty for some transgression' or does it mean, 'Because the agency was inattentive, they overlooked the misbehavior and gave it their approval by default'? We've stumbled into the looking-glass world of "contronyms"--words that are their own antonyms.