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Topic: Grammatical Mutterings (Read 28252 times)

Grammatical Mutterings
It's simply a neuter indeterminate pronoun. A construction like "The girl went shopping. It came home with a new hat."*  is quite ordinary. "She came home..." would be ungrammatical in this context.
You are most probably right, and I must be fairly outdated in German grammar. I didn't know about such usages of "es". For me, "Es regnet" was the most representative usage of it. Thanks, anyway.
  • Last Edit: 2013-12-29, 16:02:01 by Frenzie

  • ersi
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #125
Without investigating it any deeper, I assume German had some effect on Japanese at that time because they were war allies. But post-war the number one Western influence has been the American variety of English.

In general I think it is common sense that borrowings get modified and adapted to the system of the destination language. It would be ridiculous in English to insist on plural "viri" for "viruses" because Latin had such a plural. There are enough such ridiculous plurals in English already.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #126
Without investigating it any deeper, I assume German had some effect on Japanese at that time because they were war allies.
A strenuous hypothesis. Back in in the second half of the 19th and first half of the 20th century German was the primary language of science until it committed suicide,[1] which is when Japanese borrowed... well, science itself, presumably including the language for it. Directly from Germany/Prussia even, from about 1870-1890. They were the exact opposite of war allies because the Germans supported the Russians during the Russo-Japanese War.
French and English were also in the mix.

  • jax
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #127
Colonisation has had its perks, it seems. Or more accurately English as a global language, as I suspect there aren't much Dutch pronunciation in Indonesia or French in Vietnam (or German in Chinese cities like Qingdao and Dalian).  As a consequence they stick to the English alphabet and English pronunciation rules, even when they are way off.

  • ersi
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #128
It so happens that Dutch, French, and English (not to mention Spanish, Portuguese and German) share the same alphabet. The current generation is of course much affected and afflicted by the English pronunciation (particularly via Hollywood production that everybody seems too eager to swallow), but there are still traces of the original point of contact. Vietnamese current script easily resembles French more than English and, if the first foreign language in their universities is English now, the change was rather recent.

About Japan, even though Americans like to think of themselves as the main cause who bombarded the ports of Japan open for the rest of the world, the following Meiji restoration (restoration of the emperor as the main political force, not just a figurehead) took its influence more obviously from Europe. This picture does not emulate America of any age, but has easy parallels with the style of Prussia or France of the time.

  • Frenzie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #129
I suspect there aren't much Dutch pronunciation in Indonesia
They won't be pronounced quite like in Dutch if that's what you mean, but they're definitely not pronounced like in English.[1] Some rarely used words that went Greek/Latin/French → Dutch → Indonesian might be at some minor risk of Anglicization, but I imagine thousands of Dutch words should be quite safe.
A lot of words are French-style in English, think of Anglo-French police vs. Dutch politie, pronounced and in Indonesian also spelled polisi, albeit politsi in more careful Dutch speech.

  • ensbb3
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #130
Quantity is not quality.
Quantity has a quality of its own. :P

  • Belfrager
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #131
took its influence more obviously from Europe
There was a time when Europe was the reference to the world... today it needs help from the rest of the world.


Quantity has a quality of its own.  :P
ensbb3 - the philosopher, better than Confucius.
A matter of attitude.

  • rjhowie
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Re: Grammatical Mutterings
Reply #132
Yeah Europe needs help and glad my country if getting out!
"Quit you like men:be strong"