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Poll

What's the best browser of 2013?

  • Chrome/Chromium
    1 (10%)
  • Elinks
    1 (10%)
  • Firefox
    3 (30%)
  • Internet Explorer
    0 (0%)
  • Netsurf
    1 (10%)
  • Opera
    3 (30%)
  • Beer
    1 (10%)

Total Members Voted: 9

Topic: The best browser of 2013 (Read 7792 times)

  • Frenzie
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  • Administrator
The best browser of 2013
If I missed any, leave a comment. I believe JoshL said I should be able to add 'em to the poll without losing any existing votes.

Some background that might inform your vote:

  • Chromium forked Webkit and called it Blink. Google claims to have a bigger commitment to not breaking the web with a gazillion -webkit- prefixes.

  • Elinks didn't really change anything, but you don't change a winning team.

  • Firefox removed features like an easy Javascript toggle, small icons mode, and other customization options.

  • Internet Explorer 11 is the best yet, including vastly improved developer tools.

  • Netsurf 3 adds support for user CSS, improved text selection, a more native appearance, and more.

  • Opera switched from Presto to Chromium/Blink. It vastly improved on Chromium's speeddial alternative, although not on Opera's own speeddial, and allegedly improved website compatibility. It lost almost all customization ability in the process, but now has access to Chromium's vast extension catalog.

  • Last Edit: 2014-01-02, 16:09:54 by Frenzie

  • ersi
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Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #25

Is it true that there is a single developer behind Otter project? If so this is a mammoth task.

There's always just one leader. There are a few more contributors. So, yes, it's a small team. For Fifth browser there's really just one developer and this makes it a very hard mammoth task.


I tested SeaMonkey but not all Firefox add-ons (the main reason I still stick to Firefox) are compatible with SeaMnkey.

I know Seamonkey since before Firefox existed. Seamonkey was called Mozilla. Firefox (first named Phoenix and then Firebird) was created to be the lighter version of Mozilla. Now Seamonkey is the lighter and more feature-rich version of Firefox instead.

I also haven't gotten some Firefox add-ons to work with Mozilla, but I decided I don't need them so badly anyway. Which add-ons do you use?


Then I reverted to resurrected K-Meleon but it lacks many features I need.

Which features specifically?

I used to use K-Meleon once upon a time when I was on Windows.


I had a look at Midori but I wasn't impressed.

For some people, Midori still looks like an option - it's the default browser in a bunch of distros. Not to me. Lately the developers seem to have run out of ideas and now the maintenance only consists in removing options that it once had, like with Firefox. For example Midori doesn't allow hiding the tabbar anymore when only one tab is open. This option is patched into Midori only in Linux Mint.


With few exceptions (SeaMonkey, Pale Moon, K-Meleon, Otter) all browsers have been dumbed town beyond usability. I dream of a browser that doesn't suck.

How about Qupzilla?

I always used several browsers side by side for several tasks. For example it's easiest (and probably safest) to use one browser for the websites where you need to be logged in, i.e. cookies turned on, and a whole different browser for the rest of the web with cookies turned off.

Opera was the browser that did many things I needed in one. For example I liked its elaborate custom styles ability, so that the entire web was presented in the same fonts and colours. Now I use Elinks for this.

  • Frenzie
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  • Administrator
Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #26
For example it's easiest (and probably safest) to use one browser for the websites where you need to be logged in, i.e. cookies turned on, and a whole different browser for the rest of the web with cookies turned off.

Plus you're less likely to accidentally use the wrong browser than you are with different profiles (or those newer "private" tabs/windows).

  • ersi
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Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #27

For example it's easiest (and probably safest) to use one browser for the websites where you need to be logged in, i.e. cookies turned on, and a whole different browser for the rest of the web with cookies turned off.

Plus you're less likely to accidentally use the wrong browser than you are with different profiles (or those newer "private" tabs/windows).

I started this kind of practice as soon as I adopted Opera. The reason back then was simple. I liked Opera first for its email client, whereas Opera's plugins support was dismal. Instead of struggling with the plugins, I simply turned them off in Opera. When a webpage required plugins or other fanciness, I opened IE or FF from Opera.

  • Belfrager
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Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #28
Internet has turned into another way for the Saxon "Neo Liberal" hidden Nazi invasion.
The "best browser" is the best weapon for the Saxon's invaders.

The world needs totally useless browsers, not "best browsers" to deliver the invader's propaganda.
A matter of attitude.

  • ersi
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Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #29

Internet has turned into another way for the Saxon "Neo Liberal" hidden Nazi invasion.
The "best browser" is the best weapon for the Saxon's invaders.

The world needs totally useless browsers, not "best browsers" to deliver the invader's propaganda.

What is this "Saxon" that you keep talking about? Isn't Opera "Saxon"? Or is it "Germanic" and therefore something different from "Saxon"? By "Saxon", do you mean the same as when people say "Anglo-American"?

But the thing is, different browsers have originated in random countries. The first web browser ever in the world was made in Finland (Erwise). The browser I use half of the time (Elinks) is Czech. Whereas the wisdom that internet must allow primarily for open protocols along with encrypted/encryptable connections is, as far as I can tell, "Saxon".

  • Belfrager
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Re: The best browser of 2013
Reply #30
By "Saxon", do you mean the same as when people say "Anglo-American"?

Yes, Saxons were German tribes that colonized England... then the lot moved to North America and now tries to invade the entire world but facing some difficulties with that intention. Germanics are mainly Germans plus a few others around them.
All of them are kind of cousins so useless to separate them, all being the same thing. My point it's not about them but about the Internet and the way we can access it, by way of using "browsers" in our computers.

Since the Internet became the most powerful instrument of global repression it's obvious that "browsers" are a vital tool for such repression.
Therefore the best browser being the worst of all. :)

If the Internet was invented by a Saxon or a Pygmy it's indifferent to me. The Old Opera browser was, for the time, the only browser than anyone could immediately see that it's conception was not Saxon and it respected and treated users as not being idiots but at the time there was still hope the Internet could be a space of freedom, not anymore.

Why should I care with someone developing obscure browsers that gives the user a lot of options if all the content they can "browse" it's nothing but distortion, propaganda, repression and noise? It's the Internet content that matters, with that problem solved (if ever), browsers - good browsers - will appear naturally. I suppose that there's not any technical problem involved with that.

By the way, don't you think that the Browser you are involved with should have a thread where people could clearly see from where one can download it's last release? because it doesn't.
  • Last Edit: 2015-07-04, 21:54:35 by Belfrager
A matter of attitude.