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Topic: General Unix/Linux Thread (Read 64148 times)

  • Frenzie
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General Unix/Linux Thread
There is more to discuss, but opening a new topic for everything might be a bit much. Here's a quick overview of what exists already:



Some other subjects I might talk about include the compose key, Geeqie, Pandoc, qBittorrent, tmux, and VirtualBox. I semi-regularly write something about such matters on my blog.

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #400
Microsoft, Red Hat, etc. all use Linux for their massive cloud infrastructure. The fact that Red Hat also makes some desktop stuff is probably more like a bonus or even an unwanted distraction.

My hunch seems to have been correct, CNN calls it a "cloud computing firm":

https://edition.cnn.com/2018/10/28/tech/ibm-red-hat/index.html

  • ersi
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #401
Two Linux-related letdowns today.

First. There is a regression in systemd that prevents me from getting to the internet. I can connect to both wifi and LAN without error messages. I can ping to numeric addresses, but not to alphabetic addresses. And I cannot ping to the (numeric) DNS addresses in resolv.conf. The way systemd works, there is no way to manually do things with resolv.conf. According to the following thread, there ued to be things to be done, but this thread does not apply anymore, just one year later, thanks to systemd takeover of the dns resolve function https://forum.manjaro.org/t/setting-a-dns-or-nameserver/46186/9

Edit: I got this issue resolved today. It turns out somehow my resolv.conf had turned immutable. I guess it happened half a year back (that's the date on the file when it was last touched) when I lifted the harddrive from one laptop to another and it Just Worked®
Still a systemd problem, I guess. It did something when I lifted the harddrive /edit

For a while I used openrc, when a dude at Manjaro forums promoted it and created easy packages for it. It's a nice understandable init system that did its work well. When it does its work and is understandable too, it provides a sense of security that if something goes wrong, it can be fixed. Not so with systemd. Unfortunately Manjaro decisively sided with systemd - as did Arch - and the openrc promoter withdrew to create his own distro, Artix.

Second. With great excitement I thought I'd familiarise myself with the self-documentation feature in Emacs. It turns out self-documentation does not mean auto-magically generating documentation as you go on coding features of a programme. It only means help pages for Emacs https://www.emacswiki.org/emacs/SelfDocumentation
  • Last Edit: 2019-04-21, 06:38:26 by ersi

  • ersi
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #402
What's this about? Gnome app developers ranting against theming?
GTK Stylesheets can make applications look broken, and even unusable.

Icon Themes can change icon metaphors, leading to interfaces with icons that don't express what the developer intended.

App Icons are the identity of an app. Changing an app's icon denies the developer the possibility to control their brand.

Appstream Screenshots (the screenshots used in GNOME Software or Flathub) are not very useful if they look nothing like the real app does once you install it.

[...]

Though we could disable theming directly in our apps, we do not want to resort to this. We believe that a technical solution would likely not be effective, because this is not a technical problem.

The problem we're facing is the expectation that apps can be arbitrarily restyled without manual work, which is and has always been an illusion.

[...]

© Do Not Theme, 2019
On the one hand there is what the app *does* and on the other there is what the app *looks like.* What's the reason that these two should be inscrutably fused? Theming is things like enlarging the fonts, adding/changing contrast to tints in the interface, and when you can do it a little, then why not a whole lot for fun or for special needs? Why should one not be able to e.g. enlarge fonts in your app?

I understand the app developers' frustration a little bit, because my experience with Gnome is that theming is one of those things that makes Gnome unusable. But I vehemently disagree that theming is the evil. The evil is Gnome's incompetence at theming.

I have heard that GTK does not have an API for theming, every distro modifies the Adwaita theme (and ships the modification and occasionally fails to include the default) and that's plain stupid. Theming is important to have in a desktop environment and therefore there should be a DE-community policy about it. The solution should be easy: Adwaita must be there to fall back to, and there must be a procedure by which things fall back to it, duh. To disable themes would take away much of the appeal of Linux, just like Gnome's incompetence at theming has, in my case, caused me to never use it.

Mint and Manjaro have done a wonderful job at theming. They have worked very hard to achieve this. But theming is just about the looks. It should not be too hard.

For app developers, it should also not be too hard to educate yourselves to write the interface so that it is themable. Themes do not break your apps. Apps get broken by your inability to foresee that the interface could be themed differently. Every app *must* be themable, otherwise it is written by an incompetent developer! Unthemable apps are a nightmare for the user. I see this at my work every day when I need to open an app that is made exactly for a FullHD resolution screen, no more, no less; an app whose window is unresizable; an app that lacks the DE borders and titlebar; etc. (Luckily at my work there is MS Win, so it is not directly about Gnome app developers.)

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #403
Quote
Appstream Screenshots (the screenshots used in GNOME Software or Flathub) are not very useful if they look nothing like the real app does once you install it.
What a flatout bizarre statement. Sure, if they looked nothing like the real app I suppose they wouldn't be very helpful, but we're just talking about some fonts & colors & maybe icons here. The difference is actually much bigger due to the fact that I seldom see a window in a size in which I'd use it than due to what window decorations or colors are shown.

The evil is Gnome's incompetence at theming.
I think it's because they want to exude some kind of Gnome "brand".

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #404
ranger is an interesting alternative to mc.

http://ranger.github.io/

  • ersi
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #405
ranger is an interesting alternative to mc.

http://ranger.github.io/
And nnn is said to be an interesting alternative to ranger.

I have been keeping an eye on and tried them all. In my opinion, mc does just about the right amount of things in the right way, such as multi-rename, multi-copy, and other multi-select operations. Those alternatives can do all of it too, but I find the dual-pane interface cozier particularly for multi-copying of files. And I am not so comfortable with so many automatic viewers as are present in those alternatives.

In reality, my file operations are so low-key that I mostly still do ls.

  • ersi
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #406
ranger is an interesting alternative to mc.
I discovered that ranger has a live-update feature like graphical file managers.

The situation: I had to download many files that in order one by one, naming them in sequence. To keep track of my downloads at any time, I always had to see the bottom file in the directory.

Even better than graphical managers, ranger works like this:
1. Open the directory in ranger
2. Scroll to the bottom
3. In the browser (or whatever you are downloading with), keep downloading files named so that they are added as last in the directory
4. ranger live-updates the file list (and displays the bottom file even when the list is longer than the screen)

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #407
An interesting finding. :)

  • ersi
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #408
It's also a very lucky finding, because nobody expects terminal-based apps to have any automaticity. I was trying different file managers to see which one allows me to see the newest bottom file with least effort on my own part and it turned out that ranger understood what i wanted without me having to do anything. In contrast, mc and nnn act like ls - they move only when you directly tell them to.

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #409
At the same time, there are also advantages to keeping things more or less in place. In that sense adding items to the middle of the list will result in a location shift as a necessary evil, but an addition to the top or bottom outside of view will only result in a growing scrollbar.

In mc, I suppose no one is terribly interested in auto-refresh:
https://midnight-commander.org/ticket/1756

Since I mainly use Thunar and Dolphin I didn't realize mc didn't auto-update.

It's also a very lucky finding, because nobody expects terminal-based apps to have any automaticity.
I don't know; MS-DOS apps were quite advanced by the early '90s so there isn't really much of anything I wouldn't expect them to do in an even more advanced Linux environment with tremendous processing power and memory readily available. They did all the things their Windows counterparts did (MDI, etc.) except that you couldn't switch between apps as easily. Although afaik neither "GUI" nor "console" apps auto-refreshed directories at the time. But perhaps they did on Unix.

  • Frenzie
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Re: General Unix/Linux Thread
Reply #410
I've been using Qalculate as my preferred calculator for a while now, but I recently discovered Speedcrunch as an interesting alternative. (I don't like most calculators.) But Qalculate has more useful built-in conversion stuff, like currency, temperature, and distance. Speedcrunch is more plainly math/physics.

  • ersi
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Manjaro goes corp
Reply #411
The two main changes are:
  • To transfer donation funds to a non-profit "fiscal host 166" which will then accept and administer donations on the project's behalf. This secures the donations and makes their use transparent.
  • A new established company, Manjaro GmbH & Co. KG, to enable full-time employment of maintainers and exploration of future commercial opportunities.

This new structure should enable Manjaro to reach the next level, for example:
  • enable developers to commit full time to Manjaro and its related projects;
  • interact with other developers in sprints and events around Linux;
  • protect the independence of Manjaro as a community-driven project, as well as protect its brand;
  • provide faster security updates and a more efficient reaction to the needs of users;
  • provide the means to act as a company on a professional level.
Not sure how to take this. On the one hand I understand that when you do partnerships, such as when providing own-branded hardware, you need a legal entity. On the other hand, when FF went corp, things went irreversibly evil and stupid.