Skip to main content

Poll

Which

  • 21st century architecture is better than earlier architecture
    2 (66.7%)
  • 21st century architecture is worse than earlier architecture
    1 (33.3%)
  • beer is better than either
    0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 3

Topic: 21st century architecture (Read 41223 times)

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
21st century architecture
Buildings say a lot about the builders and the people who elect to use them. What buildings of this century would you like to highlight and why? Which are the best? Which are the worst? Which are interesting, which are boring? Which ones probably wouldn't be made before or after? How will they affect the neighbourhood, how would they age?

What can we say about current architecture? What should we be quiet about? What are the hopes and fears?

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #100
Quote from: mjmsprt40
Quote from: Belfrager
Quote from: mjmsprt40
I saw those images. All of them. The whole thing made me think of that horror movie. It was a Vincent Price movie no great surprise there. Once the guests were all inside, the house sealed up. Doors and windows were sealed with steel shutters, so no one could get in or out. Then people started dying. The house itself-- or rather, the ghosts of former inhabitants who had a bone to pick with the guests-- was killing everybody-- including the host and hostess.

This house that Jax has shown gives me the creeps big time. I can envision a situation where being sealed up in that house could be as deadly as any outside invader.

Mjm, the house mimics the cycles of nature, as a flower that opens by morning and closes by night. For that, it uses technology. So, a parable about the return to nature. Poetic...

An architect is/should be an artist, his work triggering emotions and raising consciousness.
By your words, this one seems to be a really good one.

The house acts as a carnivorous plant, people being the insects.
People being insects?? where did the architect got such strange idea? :)

Or is it possible that you just don't like concrete and glass as building materials for idyllic American houses? :)


Concrete and glass are not the problems. It's the way they are used that gives this particular house such a ghastly appearance. This house looks positively evil especially when it's sealed up. Those concrete "shutters" look to be a least a foot thick, maybe a bit more. What in God's Name is the owner so afraid of that he has to live in something like that??? Sealed up, I see a big, black cube unbroken by anything that suggests anything good is here. Inside the house, I can't imagine feeling good even with all the best furniture and wall coverings known to man once the place is sealed like that.

Even in the photos where the house is "open" there is such an element of fear about the place that the best recommendation I could make is to call the movers at once-- we're getting out of here.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #101
Quote from: Belfrager
Quote from: OakdaleFTL
An architect who can't build to suit clients is incompetent.

Soooo utilitarian... :)
And what would be a client that doesn't suits his architect?
Quote from: OakdaleFTL
An architect who only builds to accommodate an ideology is, even if that ideology is popular, an idiot!

Do you listen that, Frank Lloyd Wright? :)
Quote from: mjmsprt40
Even in the photos where the house is "open" there is such an element of fear about the place that the best recommendation I could make is to call the movers at once-- we're getting out of here.

Like what D&D always made me feel back when I was alive? :)

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #102
Quote from: jax
More interior design in Hong Kong, Extreme transformer home in Hong Kong: Gary Chang's 24 rooms
  • Last Edit: 2014-02-22, 19:02:12 by jax

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #103
Quote from: jimbro37
Amazing!

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #104
Dump concluded.

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #105
The series early on (in the above first episode) mentions your point about non-standard components. It uses the late 20th century Dancing House (above) here in Prague as an example of a building that is hard to clean, and hard to maintain as every component is custom-made. I like it because it fits in beautifully with the existing architecture in Prague (right), but it makes it no less expensive to maintain.

Here's a picture I took of it while visiting Prague in 2011.


  • Belfrager
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #106
Dump concluded.

Any special reason for doing such work of Hercules?
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #107

  • Egotism. Some of the My Opera threads are effectively link lists

  • Relevance. This thread is one of the My Opera clones, and a resonably recent one. Plenty left there to comment on.

  • Experiment. The above posts are (manually) copied/quoted from My Opera, makes it possible to compare presentation and syntax. This thread used more of the My Opera capabilities than most.

  • Belfrager
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #108


  • Egotism. Some of the My Opera threads are effectively link lists

  • Relevance. This thread is one of the My Opera clones, and a resonably recent one. Plenty left there to comment on.

  • Experiment. The above posts are (manually) copied/quoted from My Opera, makes it possible to compare presentation and syntax. This thread used more of the My Opera capabilities than most.


You are forgiven.
A matter of attitude.

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #109

     
  • Experiment. The above posts are (manually) copied/quoted from My Opera, makes it possible to compare presentation and syntax. This thread used more of the My Opera capabilities than most.

Conversion should be fairly straightforward. As it turns out here are some styles for images on My Opera:

Code: [Select]
.imgleft img{clear:left;float:left;margin:0 10px 0 0;max-width:48%}
.imgright img{clear:right;float:right;max-width:48%;margin:0 0 0 10px}
.imgcenter{clear:both;display:block;margin:0 auto}


IMGCENTER seems to be some kind of hidden feature.

Anyway, .imgleft and .imgright might be worth duplicating. Perhaps even with the My Opera syntax. [Edit: drat, it only supports closed bbcodes without arguments.]

PS Note how by right-clicking you can view the Exif metadata on my picture in Opera/Presto, but Chromium requires an annoying extension for everything.
  • Last Edit: 2014-02-22, 20:01:28 by Frenzie

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #110
So far I have (again manually) fixed some of the syntax differences. Nothing too surprising. This forum doesn't have floating images (IMGLEFT and IMGRIGHT), but it does have tables, which is layout-wise more powerful and predictable. For this thread (my posts at least) tables are significantly better for the list of pictures.

However, they are not quite the same. Elsewhere I used a lot of floating pictures (IMGLEFT, IMGRIGTH) as illustrations, as both the scaledown (IMG is about 100% width) and the text wrap-around were desired effects. In this thread I used them as a hack in the absence of tables, so I rewrote those posts with table.

Where I actually wanted the float, I could hack the float with a table (a row for the image and another for the text), but apart from losing the automatic wraparound, the algorithm for calculating the row width would make the picture row tiny (and thus the picture thumbnail size), and the text row almost full width.

This could work in other threads, but less so in one like here where the pictures are as important as the text. When I can use two rows of pictures (what I originally simulated by IMGRIGHT+IMGLEFT), they will both be half-width, so that works out fine.

IMG, IMGLEFT, IMGRIGHT, VIDEO have a slightly different syntax.

The collections of pictograms/smileys don't fully match.

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #111
The collections of pictograms/smileys don't fully match.

A semi-coherent set of equivalents is a desired feature in my book.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #112
Conversion should be fairly straightforward. As it turns out here are some styles for images on My Opera:


What you said above. There might be a few other bbcode differences, one of the posts has 'whisper' for instance, but basically it is pretty close.

If someone were at some point in the future to publish My Opera threads, he or she could do so pretty much unchanged. Though for closure it would be worthwhile to modify links to my.opera.com/etc to a link that would actually work.  Such a publishing shouldn't use the quote mechanism, like I did, and should likely put in the missing data fields, like posting date.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #113
A semi-coherent set of equivalents is a desired feature in my book.

I consider the WAP protocols to be a disaster cum horror, but there was one protocol/approach that I liked, their way of encoding pictograms. That's for another thread, and some other time.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #114

  • Frenzie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Administrator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #115
I like it. I'm reminded of a Dutch or German bridge, but can't seem to place it.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #116
There is a post-millennial style that I dub North European because I've seen it most often there, the South Europeans have mostly been busy with austerity. The buildings are large, boxy, have large balconies, and angular with irregular details and exposed material. They are typically in reclaimed industrial or seafaring areas.  In part newer environmental and accessibility building codes have an impact on the design. Interestingly many of these projects look better up close than from a distance. Pictures from Oslo,  Malmö, Hamburg, Prague.















Spent a day at the Hammarby Sea City district/project in Stockholm. Starting in 2003 it is a bit older than the above projects.


  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #117
The Saudi-Arabian underground


  • Belfrager
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #118
Estonian architecture. :)
Do you live in one of these, Ersi?




Quote
NOA is an easily mountable sustainable living space, adaptable to a variety of landscapes and environments. The advantage is that one can always add a module to extend the housing step by step, with each module, ones ,,saves" a wall.

It is an invention by Jaanus Orgusaar, an Estonian designer-inventor. He built the first one for his own family, and plans to add two more modules. One module is 25 sq metres.

The small house was brought to life from the need for a practical, sustainable and economical living space which would be easily mountable compiled from identical elements. The base element is a specific rhombus. The base for the structure is the rhombic dodecahedron.

The rhombic dodecahedron can be used to tessellate three-dimensional space. It can be stacked to fill a space much like hexagons fill a plane. Some minerals such as garnet form a rhombic dodecahedral crystal habit. Honeybees use the geometry of rhombic dodecahedra to form honeycomb from a tessellation of cells each of which is a hexagonal prism capped with half a rhombic dodecahedron. The rhombic dodecahedron also appears in the unit cells of diamond and diamondoids.
More
A matter of attitude.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #119
I was curious on how he intended them to be combined, and it seems to be like this:

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #120
I tried to find a tesselated version of the above structure, which my memory claimed was built in the 1970s, probably Netherlands-Germany-Britain somewhere. Google came up with this structure, which did fulfil these criteria, and was Dutch to boot (out of era/off-topic of course):



This structure is 21st century and very vaguely similar, but not what I'm looking for.

  • rjhowie
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #121
I do like a lot of modern architecture whilst at the same time admire tradtional offerings. Many official buildings in America are fine  and outstanding in the traditional sector.
"Quit you like men:be strong"

  • Belfrager
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #122
Many official buildings in America are fine  and outstanding in the traditional sector.

Such as...?
Ohh , I see, those imitations of columns and portics from the Greeks they like to put in front of buildings to give it some dignity as if they had History.
They also are famous for buying European castles and reassemble it right in the middle of Texas... really "outstanding architecture"...

Besides Frank Lloyd Wright (and his followers), I just can see a desert of imagination there and absolutely no idea whatsoever what architecture is about.
A matter of attitude.

Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #123
Not enough Islamic influence for ya? Understandably, I guess. Most Americans came from more purely Christian Europe.

  • jax
  • [*][*][*][*][*]
  • Global Moderator
Re: 21st century architecture
Reply #124
Yes, but the ancient Greeks and for the most part the ancient Romans did not.

Not that it really matters. Architecture, like all cultural expressions, is organised theft of ideas anyway.